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3-12-2013 Pilot News

March 12, 2013

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Pilot News
Marshall County, Indiana’s community news source since 1851 Volume 163 Issue No. 63 50¢
S P O R T S Page A5
Basketball
Bremen grad earns title as coach.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Weather outlook
Today Wednesday Thursday
High 37, Low 25 High 32, Low 21
High 37, Low 28
Local news and weather at www.thepilotnews.com
L O C A L
Triton takes part in
Ag Day.
Page A12
WALKERTON — The John Glenn Theatre Company is
excited to present for the first time on the John Glenn stage
the “fable of Broadway,” Guys and Dolls.
This production, based on stories and characters by
Damon Runyon, with book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows,
and music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, is scheduled for
performances at John Glenn High School on Friday and
Saturday, March 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March
17 at 2 p.m.
All seats are reserved and cost $7. Tickets may be pur-
chased by contacting John Glenn High School during school
hours. Any unreserved seats will be sold before each per-
formance.
Guys and Dolls takes the audience to New York City, circa
the late 1940’s, and presents Miss Sarah Brown, the leader of
the Save-A-Soul Mission.
Her job is to cleanse the city of gamblers and other sinners
who inhabit her neighborhood. In dealing with the deni-
zens of the city, Sarah meets Sky Masterson, a well-known
gambler, and the tension rises as the “angel” deals with the
“devil.”
Another plot within the musical deals with the harried
Nathan Detroit, operator of the local crap game, and his
long-suffering girl, Miss Adelaide, a dancer at the local
night club. Adelaide insists that she has been engaged long
enough while Nathan desperately desires to sidestep his
marital commitment. Adding to the enjoyment are Nathan’s
sidekicks, Nicely-Nicely Johnson and Benny Southstreet,
PHOTOS PROVIDED
LEFT: Sage Bladow as “Sarah,” the mission “doll,” sings of
her happiness as gambler “Sky” Masterson, played by Ryan
Kulwicki, looks on in amusement while the two rehearse a
scene from the John Glenn High School Theatre Company
production of “Guys and Dolls.” (Dark haired girl)
ABOVE: Austin Bloss as “Nathan” and Victoria Morey as
“Adelaide” rehearse one of their many comic exchanges in
the John Glenn production of “Guys and Dolls.” The perfor-
mances are scheduled for March 15, 16, and 17.
A musical ‘Fable of Broadway’ to make John Glenn stage debut
See Fable, page A3
By Lydia Beers
Staff Writer
PLYMOUTH — It’s been six months since the
city of Plymouth and Ratio Architects joined forces
to craft a new comprehensive plan for the com-
munity.
This Thursday, their work will be on display
at the Marshall County Museum in downtown
Plymouth.
“(The plan) is getting very close, we hope to
have it in nearly final form and put it up for a
public hearing in April,” said City Attorney Sean
Surrisi, who is the project coordinator.
Surrisi added that the plan will be an update
from the city’s 2003 comprehensive plan.
“There’s a lot of goals that were in the plan from
10 years ago that have been achieved or are on the
way, like River Park Square,” said Surrisi. “We
want to get the plan out to the public and do any
fine-tuning with them.”
He said that Thursday’s open house will feature
tables set up to showcase different parts of the
new plan.
“If people have a particular interest they will be
able to go to that table and leave comments on the
PHOTO COURTESY RATIO ARCHITECTS
Part of the city’s new comprehensive plan is shown. The plan will
be on display at an open house at the Marshall County Museum
Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m.
City’s new comprehensive
plan nearly ready
Public open house
Thursday night
See Plan, page A3
By Lydia Beers
Staff Writer
MARSHALL CO. — Law clerks working for county
departments could soon be making nearly $6 more per
hour.
Judge Dean Colvin asked Marshall County Council
members to raise the pay range available to pay law clerks
Monday.
“I can’t compete anymore,” said Colvin, adding that he
keeps losing his clerks to better-paying positions.
The current county pay range for law clerks is between
$11.37 and $13.08 per hour. Colvin’s current clerk will be
leaving at the end of the week for a job that pays $18 per
hour.
“There are advantages and disadvantages for a (law)
student coming to Marshall County (for the clerk posi-
tion),” said Colvin. “Of course, it’s an advantage for us,
because they provide a valuable service to us.”
He said that his clerk works about 7 to 10 hours during
the school year, and 30-35 hours during the summer.
“(The clerk) does research, special projects, some
administrative tasks that free me up to do more in the
courtroom,” said Colvin.
He clarified later that he’s not looking for any addi-
tional money.
“I’m asking for the flexibility to get out of the vacuum
I’m stuck in right now,” said Colvin.
Councilman Rex Gilliland commented, “I don’t know
how we are going to get law students to drive from
Major pay raise
approved for
county law clerks
See Clerks, page A3
By ed scherer-Berry
CorreSpondent
BOURBON – A two-hour delay Monday for Triton schools
was due to a power outage, not the weather. It offers an
opportunity to explore why school corporations delay or
cancel school, and how the process works.
At Triton, Transportation Director Chris Berger and
Superintendent Donna Burroughs keep a close watch on
weather conditions and other problem situations. In the
case of weather, Berger drives the roads of the district’s
coverage area the evening before to spot any current or
potential problems. What may seem insignificant to town
dwellers that live a block from their school can be a major
problem in the country where roads are often icy or covered
with drifted snow and students have to wait in the weather
for their bus to arrive.
Berger and Burroughs communicate between 5:30 and
5:45 a.m. on such school days. “I have until 6:15 a.m. to
make the decision on closing,” said Burroughs. “It takes
that much time before school starting to adequately get the
word out to parents. After that, it is school as usual,” she
explained.
Burroughs is in contact with other surrounding superin-
tendents and with the state highway department. Once she
has determined that a delay or closing is warranted, calls
are made to “We are closed today” at the educational service
center and “School Reach” is implemented. In the case of
the former, the service center notifies area radio and televi-
sion stations of the delay or closing, requesting that they
broadcast the notification. “School Reach” is a computer-
based telephone calling system which automatically calls all
families in the Triton district with a pre-recorded message
by Burroughs.
From time to time, she has to field complaints from par-
ents who are naturally inconvenienced by school delays.
“I certainly sympathize with parents who might be pre-
vented from getting to work on time,” said Burroughs.
“Unfortunately, we cannot predict well in advance when a
problem is going to occur. It is a difficult choice to make,
and I bear full responsibility for making it. The bottom line
is that I have to put student safety over inconvenience to
families. I guess the old saying is true: ‘It is better safe than
sorry.’”, she concluded.
Monday’s delay was power-related. In the wee hours,
power went off for much of Bourbon and all of Etna Green.
As it turns out, a transformer in the alley behind the
Bourbon City Hall went out, causing the outage. While that
would not affect transporting students, it would mean that
furnace fans could not blow heat over the buildings and all
classrooms would be dark, especially ones on the interior of
the buildings. A call at 6:15 a.m. to NIPSCO indicated that
it would take three hours to get the power back on—thus, a
Triton’s unexpected delay puts process to work
See Triton, page A2
Front1 Front1
Obituaries
Local
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Page A2
Death Notice
Duane A. Balaban
March 11, 2013
MACY — Duane A. Balaban, 68, Macy, died Monday at
2:55 a.m. at Woodlawn Hospital. Arrangements are pend-
ing at Good Family Funeral Home, Rochester.
Mary Ruth Girten
Dec. 31, 1918-March 9, 2013
PLYMOUTH — Mary Ruth Girten, 94, died peacefully
at her home, surrounded by her loving family at 7:15 p.m.
Saturday, March 9, 2013.
A longtime Plymouth resident,
she was born New Year’s Eve, Dec.
31, 1918, in Plymouth, the daughter
of Walter J. Nelson and Stella May
Fletcher.
She graduated from Lincoln High
School with the class of 1936. She
worked at the telephone company in
Plymouth. For 31 years, she worked
in the cafeteria of the Plymouth
Community School System, retiring
in 1995.
On Jan. 26, 1941, in Plymouth, she married the love
of her life, Harry Girten. They made a home and a life
together until his death in February of 2000. Married 59
years, Mary missed him so much.
She was a lifetime member of the Trinity United Methodist
Church. Her church and her family were the most impor-
tant things in her life.
Mary was always involved in her children’s activities. A
huge sports fan, she was the longest holder of season tick-
ets to athletic events and a Big Red Boosters Club mem-
ber. She was known by all of the students as “Grandma
Girten.”
The mother of seven children, she was honored by the
Plymouth Pilot as “Mother of the Year.”
Mary leaves a large and loving family to cherish her
memory.
Her sons are: Larry (Amme) Girten: Bill (Donna) Girten,
Bob Girten all of Plymouth. The daughters are: Dee (Jim)
Brown, Plymouth: Lynn (Steve) Jacox Michigan City: Anne
Gantz, Plymouth, and Patti Girten, Plymouth.
Two brothers also survive her death. They are: Wendell
Nelson and Gordon Nelson. Three sisters also survive:
Joan (Fred) Wolff, Rosemarie Campbell and Helen “Mick”
Nelson, all of Plymouth. Many nieces and nephews also
survive.
Mary was preceded in death by a daughter, Janie Louise
Girten, her husband, Harry, and two brothers; James and
Wayne Nelson.
Fourteen grandchildren survive Mary’s passing along
with several stepgrand and great-grandchildren.
The grandchildren are: Melanie (Tom) Van Dyke, Angie
(Tim) Eads, Ronna (Ron) Sissel, Ted (Carol) Brown, Gina
(James) Young, Nicole (Jason) Christy: Matt (Danielle)
Gantz, Jill (Chris) Craig, Korey (Nate) Terronne, Blair
Girten and Elizabeth, Katie (Brad) Clauss, Kasey (Evan)
Record, Quentin (Ashley) Girten and Joel Girten.
Many thanks to special neighbors and care providers,
Maureen and Cheryl.
Visitation will be from 2 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, March
13, 2013, in the Johnson-Danielson Funeral Home,
1100 N. Michigan St., Plymouth
Funeral services for Mary will be held at 11 a.m.
Thursday, March 14, 2013, in the funeral home with
Tom Padberg, chaplain of the Center for Hospice
Care and Pastor Mark Need, pastor of Trinity United
Methodist Church officiating.
Interment will follow in New Oakhill Cemetery.
Memorial contributions in Mary’s name may be made to
the Center for Hospice Care, 112 S. Center St., Plymouth,
IN 46563, the Plymouth High School Athletic Department,
1 Big Red Dr., Plymouth, IN 46563
and the Trinity United Church, 425 S.
Michigan St., Plymouth, IN 46563.
To share memories with the
family or to express condolence, please
visit the funeral home’s website at:
www.johnson-danielson.com
Charlotte Edel
Nov. 18, 1924-March 10, 2013
BREMEN — Charlotte Edel, 88, formerly of Bremen,
passed away Sunday, March 10, 2013 at Kosciusko
Community Hospital. She was born Nov. 18, 1924 to John
and Inez (Frenger) Edel in Bremen.
Charlotte was born into a very
large and loving family. She gradu-
ated from Bremen High School with
the class of 1942. She was a lifelong
member of the Bremen VFW Ladies’
Auxiliary and an avid bowler in the
women’s traveling bowling league.
Charlotte was loved by numerous
nieces and nephews, and will be
greatly missed.
Charlotte is survived by three sis-
ters, Vivian Walker of South Bend, Mary Aker of Plymouth,
and Marcia Corl of Syracuse.
She was preceded in death by five brothers, Bob,
Housey, Dutch, Hunk, and Stan, and five sisters, Alma,
Jane, Bethel, Loma, and Joan.
Although Charlotte never married or had children, she
loved the Corl children as her own.
A funeral service in honor of Charlotte will be held at 5
p.m. Wednesday, March 13, 2013 at Mishler Funeral Home,
Bremen. Pastor John Perkinson will officiate. Burial will take
place in the Bremen Cemetery at a later time.
Friends may call from 3-5 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral
home.
Memorials may be given to the Bremen VFW Ladies’
Auxiliary.
The Mishler Funeral Home in Bremen is assisting the
family with arrangements.
Condolences may be sent to the family at www.mishler-
funeralhomes.com.
two-hour delay was called.
Then, as these things sometimes happen, the power was
restored fifteen minutes later at 6:30 a.m.
There would have been no reason to delay school and cre-
ate a nuisance for parents. By that time, however, the word
had already gone out, and changing in mid-stream would
have been very confusing to district parents.
All area school systems have some similar system for
making the decision on school delays/closings.
Triton, cont. from
A1
INDIANAPOLIS — Camp Riley empowers children with
physical disabilities by providing enriching, life-changing
experiences in a traditional camping environment tailored
to their individual needs. For 58 years, campers have shat-
tered perceived limitations, met new friends and reached
higher achievements, allowing them to return home with an
increased sense of independence and confidence.
“Choose Your Own Adventure” is the theme for Camp
Riley in 2013. Online applications to secure a spot for Camp
Riley are available at RileyKids.org/Camp. April 15 is the
application deadline.
The staff-to-camper ratio never exceeds 1-to-3. Children
can attend one of five Camp Riley sessions offered during
a six-week span. Sessions offer camaraderie and thrills
through swimming, hiking, horseback riding, vertical
climbing, canoeing, art projects and other activities. New
families may also attend Newcomer’s Day on Saturday,
May 25 to learn more about Camp Riley. RileyKids.org also
offers an online photo gallery showcasing camp activities.
Camp Riley takes place at Bradford Woods, Indiana
University’s outdoor recreation center located 20 miles
southwest of Indianapolis (in Martinsville, Ind.). In 2012,
238 campers enrolled in Camp Riley, representing 53
Indiana counties and five states: Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky,
Maryland, Michigan and Ohio. Since 1955, Camp Riley
has been a “home away from home” to more than 12,000
children.
Riley Children’s Foundation subsidizes the majority of
each child’s camper fee. The fee families are asked to pay is
determined on a sliding scale related to household income.
In 2010, 36 percent of Camp Riley families qualified for a
reduced camper fee. Families are also encouraged to raise
money to send their child to Camp Riley. Donors inter-
ested in providing the Camp Riley experience to Indiana
children with the gift of a campership should contact Riley
Children’s Foundation.
Questions should be directed to Riley Children’s
Foundation at 1-877-867-4539 or campriley@rileykids.org.
2013 Camp Riley Theme: “Choose Your Own Adventure!”
Nature explorations, artistic creations, waterfront quests,
musical journeys, and expeditions on horseback! Come
explore the outdoors and discover endless possibilities for
fun and excitement at Bradford Woods. Join us and make
your own adventure this summer at Camp Riley 2013!
Newcomer’s Day
Saturday, May 25, 2013
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Newcomer’s Day lets new campers and families do a
“trial run” with a visit to Camp Riley at Bradford Woods.
Camp families can see the facilities and property, experi-
ence camp activities, attend parent informational sessions,
discussions and activities, and join a question-and-answer
session with camp staff.
2013 Camp
Riley Enrollment
Now Open
See Riley, page A3
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Funeral Home
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Clinic
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Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
County Digest
who “run interference,” not only against Miss Adelaide, but
also with Lt. Brannigan who is committed to shutting down
Nathan’s gambling enterprise. Recognizable songs include
“Bushel and a Peck,” “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ The Boat,”
“I’ve Never Been In Love Before,” “If I Were A Bell,” and the
nightclub standard, “Luck Be A Lady.”
“I think it’s the music that first attracted me to the show,”
said veteran John Glenn director, Richard Fansler. “It’s a
show we’ve never done before and after directing forty-
five productions, some more than once over the years, I
wanted something new. I wanted to see if we could put our
own spin on these great songs. Fortunately, our kids have
accepted the challenge and are having a great time. That
makes all the hours we spend rehearsing worthwhile.”
Senior Sage Bladow and sophomore Ryan Kulwicki who
portray “Sarah” and “Sky” agree with their director. “The
work ethic of this group is amazing. So many of the actors
are involved in other activities, but are still willing to work
hard,” says Bladow, who is also in the band and show choir,
among other activities.
“We’re really a team,” Kulwicki, who runs cross coun-
try and track adds, “and we work together to try to make
the hard things look easy.” Seniors Victoria Morey and
Austin Bloss who have the comic roles of “Adelaide” and
“Nathan” are quick to join in. “Our chemistry just works,”
says Morey, who is also heavily involved with the school’s
FFA program, “it’s easy to yell at each other because we’ve
known one another for so long.” Bloss, a baseball player,
believes that being able to work with different combinations
of students each production and still maintain the success of
the program is important. “Someone may have a small role
in one show and be a lead in the next. Everything just seems
to fall into place,” he states.
As for their characters and memorable moments, the four
decide easily. The ‘kitchen shower’ scene is Morey’s favor-
ite. “It’s so ridiculous that it just makes me laugh. Who
would really get excited about ladles and steak knives?”
For Bloss, his duet with Morey’s “Adelaide” is a highlight.
“I get to be angry and funny at the same time. Nothing is
better than that.” The end of act one is Bladow’s favorite
moment of the show. “I just like how quickly we get to see
the extremes of Sarah’s growing relationship with Sky. She
loves him, then she hates him in the next moment. It’s fun
to play.” For Kulwicki, the moment was a “no-brainer.”
“Luck Be a Lady, definitely,” he states. “It’s a classic song
and it is the moment I get to be dramatic after spending
most of my time trying to be ‘cool.’ It’s a lot of fun.”
Rounding out the cast for this production are Adam
Dodson, Ryan Arick, Mark Einhorn, Chris Mahank, Anthony
Borrelli, Garrett O’Dell, Aacen O’Connor, Daniel Shinkle,
Thaddeus Van Overberghe, Nick Weith, Jacob Kickbush,
Brianne Richardson, Austin Whitaker, Nathan Kickbush,
Dustin Kerckhove, Ciarra Kerckhove, Ally Pudlo, Emily
Krohn, Shelby Fortlander, Julia Jacobson, Justina Weiss,
Allie Pearish, Nicole Fullmer, Mackenzie Moore, Aubry
Banks, Sidney Carson, Paige Sokol, Cheyenne Garrett, Paige
Wiseman, Rebecca Radcliff, and Rachel Kunnen. Pit band
members are J.J. Silvey, Ann Heckman-Davis, Bryce Lemert,
Mason Strycker, Brandon Boyd, and James Farnsworth,
Christian Niedbalski. The sound and light crew is Jacob
Sleek, Julia Zehner, Dustin Annis, and Cole Jacobson. Tech
crew workers are Dillynn Schleg, Josh Gast, Josh Bolen, and
Charlene Manns. The production staff includes Connie
Fansler, Jennifer Medich, Liz Drotar, Mitzi Knepper, Dan
Fortlander, and Adam Pearish. The production is directed
by Richard Fansler.
When asked why people should attend the show, Fansler
was quick. “These kids commit themselves to three months
of rehearsal for the sole purpose of entertaining an audi-
ence; they live for that moment when they know they have
succeeded in connecting with others in a darkened theater.
They could be out doing other things, but they choose to
spend their time doing something positive for the commu-
nity. I think that is a terrific reason.” Bladow adds, “We
are not your typical high school musical. Everyone works
really hard to make the performances as high quality and
professional-looking as possible.”
Morey, with a mischievous smile, states it more simply.
“We kick it up a notch.”
Fable, cont. from A1
Traffic stop leads to drug arrest
PLYMOUTH - Two Plymouth men are in custody for drug
related offenses.
Marshall County Sheriff’s patrolman John Bryant made
the stop Saturday night at 8 p.m. near the intersection of
U.S. 30 and the Plymouth-Goshen Trail. Bryant suspected
that the driver - Brandyn Ross, was under the influence of
a controlled substance. A passenger in the vehicle, Kenneth
Davis, was also found to have Marijuana on his person,
along with prescription drugs.
Officers also located Schedule III narcotics in the vehicle.
Ross was arrested and lodged at the Marshall County Jail
for operating while intoxicated by a controlled substance
and possession of a controlled substance. Davis was arrest-
ed and lodged at the Marshall County Jail for possession of
marijuana and unlawful possession of prescription drugs.
Patrolman Bryant was assisted by Patrolman Jordan Rans
and Brouyette of the Marshall County Police.
Criminal Trespass
PLYMOUTH - A Plymouth man is in custody for criminal
trespass.
Plymouth Patrolman Derek Workman responded to
Walmart on Oak Drive in Plymouth. He took into custody
Michael Shaine Patrick, 32, of Plymouth. He was charged
with criminal trespass for breaking a no trespass order of
August of 2012.
He was taken to the Marshall County Jail.
Police Reports
draft,” said Surrisi. “People can tailor their experience to
whatever their interest or level of experience is.”
Members of the project’s steering committee and Ratio
Architects will be on hand during the open house to answer
questions.
“One of the things that we did is that we added an eco-
nomic development section,” said Jackie Turner of Ratio
Architects. “The 2003 plan was focused a lot on growth,
but what happened is that the city population stayed very
steady. Plymouth had very little growth. So we spent a lot of
time focusing on redevelopment for existing areas.”
Turner added, “We also realized that communities need
a lot of direction. We added an implementation matrix that
lays out specific action steps. It also identifies the entities
that should take responsibility for getting those items done.
We feel that the success of Plymouth going forward needs to
be based on the revitalization of its core.”
Surrisi said that the comprehensive plan is something that
city department heads, members of the city council, and
members of the plan commission will have a copy of and use
regularly when making decisions.
“This comprehensive plan update is also a key component
of the city’s application for the Stellar Communities Pilot
Program,” said Surrisi.
This grant come from the
Indiana Office of Community
and Rural Affairs, the
Indiana Department of
Transportation, and the
Indiana Housing and
Community Development
Authority. Just two Indiana
counties each year are select-
ed to receive it.
“Plymouth will learn if it
is a finalist in the Stellar
Communities competition
March 15,” said Surrisi.
The final draft of the new
comprehensive plan will be
available online and at the
clerk’s office. The public
can also see the plan at the
open house from 6 to 8 p.m.
Thursday at the Marshall
County Museum in down-
town Plymouth.
Plan, cont. from A1
Valparaiso for only $13 an hour…this is one of those special-
ized fields.”
Council president Matt Hassel noted that if the pay range
were adjusted for law clerks, that would apply to every law
clerk in every county department.
Council member Judy Stone said, “It’s not like everyone
is going to automatically get $18.”
She added that department heads should use discretion
and pay their clerks an hourly range to reflect their experi-
ence and year in school.
After further discussion, council members voted to raise
the minimum end of the pay range for law clerks from
$11.37 to $18 per hour.
Clerks, cont. from A1
Camp Riley offers five levels of camp
programming:
Riley 2
June 16 - 21, 2013 (Ages 8-18)
This one-week session is for campers who
benefit from a 1-to-2 staff-to-camper ratio.
Be prepared to have the time of your life!
Kan-Du
June 30 - July 5, 2013 (Ages 8-18)
This session is specifically designed for
youth with cognitive and physical function-
ing levels assessed between 0 and 48 months
and who thrive in a 1-to-1 staff-to-camper
ratio.
Riley 1
July 7 - 12, 2013 (Ages 8-18)
This session is for campers who benefit
from a 1-to-1 staff-to-camper ratio. Be pre-
pared for an exhilarating adventure like
none other.
Riley 3
July 14 - 26, 2013 (Ages 8-18)
This two-week session is specifically
designed for campers who are ready for a
longer camp experience and thrive in a 1-to-
3 staff-to-camper ratio.
Venture
July 14 - 26, 2013 (Ages 14-18)
This two-week session is for older camp-
ers who are ready for a longer camp experi-
ence and thrive in a 1-to-3 staff-to-camper
ratio.
Riley Specialty Camps
Riley Hospital for Children sponsors spe-
cialty camps that also take place at Bradford
Woods, home of Camp Riley. The specialty
camps are supported by Riley Children’s
Foundation, but coordinated through their
clinics at the hospital.
Camp Hi-Lite
June 2 - 7, 2013
Youth ages 8-22 with Down Syndrome
This one-week session is coordinated
by the Ann Whitehall Down Syndrome
Program, a part of the Developmental
Pediatric Clinic. Campers experience tradi-
tional camp activities in a fully accessible
environment, as they increase their social
skills and reach new levels of independence.
Contact Marsie Harrington at 317.944.4264
for more information.
Camp About Face
June 16 - 21, 2013
Youth ages 8-18 with Craniofacial
Anomalies
One of the only summer camps in the
country designed for children that have
been born with a cleft palate or lip as well
as other anomalies of the face and skull.
This one-week session, coordinated by the
Cranial Facial Clinic, encourages campers
to become less self-conscious and more self-
confident in a setting that is fun for every-
one. Contact Carol Ritter or Trish Severns at
317.274.2489 for more information.
Camp Independence
July 28 - August 2, 2013
Youth ages 8-18 with Blood Diseases
(Sickle Cell Anemia, Hemophilia, etc.)
During this one-week session coordinated
by the Hematology and Oncology Clinic,
campers learn how to manage their chronic
health condition while maintaining an active
outdoor lifestyle. Campers have the oppor-
tunity to experience traditional camp activi-
ties, such as horseback riding, swimming,
sports, arts, and campouts; all while having
medical personal available 24-hours a day.
Contact Andy Harner at 317.944.0115 for
more information.
Jail bookings
The following were booked on preliminary charges into
Marshall County Jail:
•  Nichole  Leann  Dudek,  29,  Knox,  was  arrested  March  7 
by the Indiana State Police for probation violation.
•  Jose  Luis  Torres,  37,  Plymouth,  was  arrested  March  7 
by the Marshall County Police Department for probation
violation.
•  Joseph  Henry  Michael  Milleman,  24,  Plymouth,  was 
arrested March 7 by the MCPD for residential entry, posses-
sion controlled substance, operating a vehicle while intoxi-
cated, battery resulting in bodily injury, operating a vehicle
with a Schedule I or II controlled, and intimidation.
•  Michael  Shaine  Patrick,  32,  North  Judson,  was  arrested 
March 7 by the PPD for trespass.
• Cody James Schaetzle, 19, Bourbon, was arrested March 
7 by the PPD for theft.
•  Adam  Cory  Wagers,  23,  Grovertown,  was  arrested 
March 7 by the PPD for dealing/delivering/manufacturing
methamphetamine.
•  Jordan  Lee-ann  Bunton,  18,  Plymouth,  was  arrested 
March 7 by the PPD for dealing/delivering/manufacturing
methamphetamine.
• Dianna Marie Watson, 20, Syracuse, was arrested March 
7 by the PPD for dealing/delivering/manufacturing meth-
amphetamine, and possession of methamphetamine.
•  Kimberlie  Sue  Frazier,  33,  Plymouth,  was  arrested 
March 7 by the PPD for dealing/delivering/manufacturing
methamphetamine.
•  Damien  Insixiengmay,  30,  South  Bend,  was  arrested 
March 7 by the PPD for driving while suspended.
• Jaime Jimenez-Gomez, 32, Bremen, was arrested March 
8 by the MCPD for operating a motor vehicle without ever
receiving a license.
Riley, cont. from A2
FORT WAYNE (AP) —
Parkview Health plans to
spend $5 million to renovate
a building that will be used
by the Fort Wayne Veteran
Affairs Medical Center as
an outpatient mental health
clinic.
The Journal Gazette
reports officials announced
Monday the one-story,
25,000-square-foot outpa-
tient clinic is expected to
open in 2015. The VA will
contribute about $1.5 million
in design and construction
costs and pay yearly rent of
$1.36 million to Parkview for
20 years. The funding was
authorized by Congress in
2011.
The VA Medical Center
in Fort Wayne treated more
than 3,200 military veterans
for mental health problems
during the most recent fis-
cal year.
The facility is expected
to have about 100 staff and
administrators.
Parkview to
spend $5M
to renovate
building
Local3
CONTEMPORARY PILGRIMAGE
(Following Christ in our daily lives)
2013 Lenten Lunch Series
First Presbyterian Church
401 N. Walnut St., Plymouth, IN • 936-3619
Shatford Hall in the First Presbyterian Church
Thurs., March 14 speaker at 12:00 (Noon)
Sandy Read
Opinion
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Page A4
Shoe
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vidual or organization will not be published. Likewise, we
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area businesses.
•We will not publish letters endorsing a candidate or a
political party. These items will appear in our newspaper
only as paid political advertising: Endorsements; endorse-
ments as photo opportunities; endorsements as Letters to the
Editor; position by candidates on issues (other than pre-elec-
tion coverage by news staff. Opinion page commentaries by
candidates in local elections will not be printed from March
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(USPS 436-440)
Radical change is more
than a Band-Aid or new pill
February is always a special month
of remembrance for the Kanzius
Cancer Research Foundation as Feb.
18 is the day of John Kanzius’ pass-
ing; it marks four years since John
succumbed to a rare form of B-cell
leukemia. During this time of year, we
always take time to remember John,
his experiences, and why his dream of
“a better way” is essential. Each morn-
ing, I take a moment to think about
what motivates me personally to make
his dream a reality.
John was driven by his own experi-
ences. For me, I am motivated daily
by the people I meet and stories I
hear about loved ones going through
cancer treatment and those who
stand by unable to change what their
friends and family are experiencing.
In the four years since John’s passing,
technology has made “a better way”
to treat cancer a possibility and the
Kanzius Foundation is determined to
deliver a solution to this disease.
Think back with me and consider
the technological evolution of the tele-
phone. In my life, I have gone from
a phone on the wall (both rotary and
touch-tone), to a wireless phone where
I could walk from room to room while
talking, to a car phone in a suitcase, to
a flip mobile phone, to the infamous
blackberry and now an iPhone…which
is so much more than a mobile phone.
It is a device with power; the source of
immediate information at my finger-
tips. This is radial change.
Over the years, the human race has
seen many radical changes in tech-
nology — everyone and everything
from computers to doctors, have seen
changes big and small. Technology
has fundamentally changed how ill-
ness and disease are discovered and
treated. Technology has allowed the
Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation
to spread John Kanzius’ novel, inno-
vative idea from his garage to mul-
tiple research labs across the globe.
The Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave
Cancer Treatment is a result of this
radically changing technology and
will one day change countless lives as
a result.
The “Band-Aid” mindset in cancer
treatments thus far, has been to find
another pill – a newer, better version
of medicine that exists already. But
as technology has proven, the answer
is not another pill. The technology
to change this disease and its body
altering treatments exists. The Kanzius
Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer
Treatment is a step in a new direction,
and together we can change the cancer
treatment paradigm. We, as a human
race so dependent on different types of
technology, still need to make progress
where it matters most – in saving lives
from one the world’s deadliest killers.
The methodology behind the
Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave
Cancer Treatment is rather simple —
direct small metallic particles specifi-
cally to cancer cells and pass a con-
trolled radiowave past them, which
will heat the metal and destroy cancer-
ous cells without affecting the healthy,
neighboring cells. But before John
Kanzius conceived this idea and devel-
oped the technology to deliver the
method to the human body, he realized
that a solution to the problem of dev-
astating cancer treatments was needed
and he acted on that realization.
John’s original idea was a solution
to his own experiences with chemo-
therapy and those of the children he
watched receive treatments around
him. John and now the support-
ers of the Kanzius Cancer Research
Foundation understand that a radical
solution, not a Band-Aid, is needed to
stop the increasing number of cancer
deaths — a new pill is not the answer.
The time has come to stop putting a
Band-Aid on the problem and pro-
vide the real solution. That is radical
change!
Mark A. Neidig, Sr. CFRM, is execu-
tive director at Kanzius Cancer Research
Foundation in Erie, Pa. and a former
Plymouth resident. He can be reached at
MNeidig@Kanzius.org
Making
Waves
By Mark a. Neidig,
Sr. CFrM
• State editorial views •
Libraries and newspapers allies in
keeping government honest
Vincennes Sun-Commercial
What we like best about the story of Vernon Hugh
Bowman’s legal battle against Monsanto is not its obvious
David vs. Goliath quality, although the little guy taking on
the giant is always interesting.
A small farmer from Sandborn battling a true behemoth of
the agribusiness world, in a case argued before the United
States Supreme Court, seems tailor-made for a TV movie —
although probably on one of the cable networks.
That Bowman did much of the original legal work himself,
typing up documents on an old Royal typewriter with a rib-
bon so worn the legal eagles at Monsanto couldn’t make out
his arguments, harkens back to a similar case, that involving
Clarence Earl Gideon’s fight for a retrial on the basis of his
being denied an attorney.
Gideon’s case was immortalized in Anthony Lewis’ great
book, “Gideon’s Trumpet,” later made into a movie of the
same name with Henry Fonda in the title role.
Too bad Fonda is dead, for he’d have made a great Vernon
Hugh Bowman when the movie version of Monsanto vs.
Bowman is made.
What we like best about this story is where Bowman did
much of the research he incorporated into his legal briefs —
a branch of the local public library.
He would go to the Sandborn branch of the Bicknell-Vigo
Township Public Library and access the Internet there to
look up information, learn more about genetically-modified
seeds and read about other patent-law cases.
That’s cool.
Today marks the beginning of “Sunshine Week,” when
we in the newspaper business celebrate (really advocate for)
the public’s right to know, so that you can have access to
information about your government, not just in Washington,
D.C., or in Indianapolis but right here at home, too.
Usually, the “access” we in the business seek swirls around
the requirement for open meetings at which decisions are
made by elected officials before God and man, with any infor-
mation important to the public’s clear understanding of why
those decisions were made readily available for inspection.
But we’ve been thinking that maybe we advocate for too
little, that we in the newspaper business should acquire
ambition and be more broad minded, bolder in our call for
greater public access to public information.
As the example of Vernon Hugh Bowman clearly shows,
an important ally in our quest for open government is the
public library, where citizens can access the type of infor-
mation they need or are just curious to know, not just from
books and reference materials, newspapers and journals, but
also online through the Internet.
Every time a public library loses funding and must reduce
hours, whenever it must choose to keep the lights on over
subscribing to newspapers and periodicals, must forego
adding to its shelves the latest books, the public’s access to
information is limited.
The citizen needs that one place where he can go to find
something out, to learn, where he can go and look some-
thing up to put his mind at ease or discover an injustice that
riles him up.
Libraries and newspapers, together we provide the vigi-
lant citizen the resources to demand honest government.
Copyright 2013 Vincennes Sun Commercial
Another time zone debate
(Lafayette) Journal and Courier
Pushed to the extreme backside of a time zone is bound
to produce some pitch-black mornings. Ask any crossing
guards you happen to meet.
That dark is evident as the nation springs forward with
daylight saving time.
The timing is appropriate, then, for a revival of Indiana’s
never-ending debate over the time.
Hoosiers spent decades hashing over whether to join
nearly every other part of the United States by observing
daylight saving time. Nearing a decade of daylight saving,
the state seems none the worse for it.
Now comes an effort to shift the majority of Indiana from
Eastern time to Central time.
Members of the General Assembly, at the prompting of a
group called the Central Time Coalition, are bucking for a
resolution that would send the time zone question to a sum-
mer study committee and a series of public meetings.
It seems like wasted effort. The fight over which region
holds most sway over Indiana likely will never produce a
clear winner. Leave it alone.
It seems that a better effort would be to persuade Congress
to roll back the aggressive daylight saving schedules put in
place starting in 2007.
The idea in Congress was that the only thing better than
daylight saving time was even more of it, adding roughly a
month to either end of the previous schedule. (Example: The
spring forward day in 2006 was April 2.)
That extra daylight saving time in the late winter and in
the fall does no favors for kids walking to school and to the
rest of the morning commute. Is the payoff of more light in
the evenings so soon in the year actually worth it? That’s
doubtful. It’s time to rethink the timing of daylight saving.
Copyright 2013 www.jconline.com
Opinion4
Contact us: email sports@thepilotnews.com or call 574-936-3104
Sports
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 • Page A5
Sports5
Results
Pilot Photo/ James Costello
Triton’s Clay Yeo hugs THS Athletic Director Mason
McIntyre following the Trojans’ Regional 13 champion-
ship win over Pioneer Saturday night in Bourbon.
BOURBON — After helping put the Trojans back on
top at the Class A Regional 13 over the weekend, Triton
senior Clay Yeo was honored with his second Indiana
Basketball Coaches Association/ Subway Player of the
Week honor this season Monday.
Yeo was named the District 1 Player of the Week after
averaging 26 points and seven rebounds in a pair of
wins over Fort Wayne Canterbury and Pioneer at home
at the Trojan Trench.
The 6’6” Valparaiso University recruit scored 17 points
with nine rebounds and five assists as Triton handed
Canterbury a 44-41 reprisal after the Trojans’ double
overtime loss to the Cavaliers in the regional champion-
ship last season. He then followed with 35 points, five
Yeo tabbed for
2nd Player of
the Week honor
The P-town 14’s volleyball team
traveled to Indianapolis on Sunday,
competing in the Midwest Junior
Challenge. P-town captured first
place in the Gold Division with a per-
fect 5-0 finish on the day.
Pictured for the team are back row:
Coach Derek Eveland, Alli Andrews,
Ali Dennie, Makenzie Quissell,
Lanae Singleton and Belle Beeson;
front row: Erin Hunter, Emily Hoffer,
Kennedy Snyder and Bailey Eveland.
Photo submitted
P-town 14’s win Midwest Junior Challenge
ASHEVILLE, N.C. — A Bremen grad and
former Ancilla basketball coach has guided
Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North
Carolina to its first-ever postseason cham-
pionship.
Greg Neeley, a 2003 BHS grad, took the
reins at Warren Wilson College this year
after a two-year stint as head coach of the
Chargers men’s basketball program. In his
first season at the helm of the Owls, Neeley
coached the team to the United States
Collegiate Athletics Association Division II
championship, which they clinched with
a 76-68 victory over Penn State Fayette
in the tournament final in Uniontown
Pennsylvania last weekend.
It was Warren Wilson’s first national
championship in the more than four decades
the Owls have had a basketball program,
and Neeley credited his team’s five seniors
and the general unselfishness of the squad
with the championship in an interview with
the school’s news site, the Warren Wilson
Echo.
“I do think that our team chemistry has
been a big advantage for us,” he told the
site. “Our guys genuinely care about being
good teammates and have been willing to
sacrifice for the betterment of the team.
“The work ethic and drive of our seniors
is a big reason for our success. Each one of
our seniors brings a unique skill set physi-
cally and emotionally, and their ability to
mesh and push our team has been tremen-
dous.”
Neeley finished his first season at Warren
Wilson with a head coaching record of 19-10,
which included a season-ending 12-game
win streak culminating in the Owls’ USCAA
DII title. Warren Wilson entered the 10-team
tournament as a No. 9 seed, knocking off
No. 1 seed New Hampshire College —
which boasted a 33-4 record at the time — in
the tourney quarterfinals.
As the head coach at Ancilla prior to
his current role at Warren Wilson, Neeley
helped the Chargers notch their second
highest win total since 2005 in 2011-2012
on the way to the National Junior College
Athletic Association District 8 Tournament.
In his first season as head coach at Ancilla,
Neeley led the program to its second most
conference wins.
After graduating from Ohio Northern
University, Neeley started his coaching
career as a JV coach and varsity assistant
at Allen East High School in Lafayette,
Ohio. He moved on to become the top
assistant coach at Piedmont College in
Demorest, Georgia, where he coordinat-
ed the NCAA DIII program’s recruiting
efforts while working toward his Master’s
of Business Administration. Neeley also led
the Piedmont men’s and women’s tennis
programs to a six-win improvement in his
first and only season as head coach.
Neeley is a 2003 Bremen grad and the son
of Randy and Karen Neeley. He and his wife
Jessica reside in Swannanoa, N.C.
Bremen grad Neeley coaches Warren Wilson to 1st national title
7th grade girls basketball
Lincoln seventh
rallies past Urey
Lincoln’s seventh grade girls basketball team battled back
from a halftime deficit to hand Urey a 32-25 defeat.
Leading scorers for Lincoln were Alli Andrews with 11
points and Kenzie Quissell with seven.
The Red Storm end their season Wednesday at home
against Knox.
The Lincoln seventh grade girls B team also beat Urey by
a comfortable 29-11 margin. Leading Lincoln in that contest
were Kirsten Brown with eight points and Shayla Noble with
seven.
6th grade girls basketball
Bremen wins 2 at New Prairie
Bremen’s sixth grade girls basketball team handed host
New Prairie a pair of losses on the road in New Carlisle
Monday.
In the A-game, Bremen’s A team defeated New Prairie
31-10, and the Lady Lions B team won 19-14.
Kaelyn Shively and Karlee Feldman led Bremen’s A team
with 10 points each. Andrea Brooke scored seven points,
while Allyssa Fanning and Kaitlin Yelaska chipped in with
two each.
Caitlyn Myers, Ashley Jeffirs and Rylee Hersberger each
put up four points in a balanced effort for Bremen’s B team.
Jessica Ziranana added three points and Courtney Goodlink
and Carly Snyder added two apiece.
BIG EAST
TOURNAMENT
NO. 2 NOTRE DAME 83,
NO. 16 LOUISVILLE 59
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP)
— Kayla McBride scored 17
points and Skylar Diggins
added 14 to help Notre
Dame beat Louisville in the
semifinals of the Big East
tournament.
Notre Dame advanced
to the championship game
for the third straight year
and its seventh since join-
ing the conference in 1995.
The Fighting Irish (30-1)
will play No. 3 Connecticut
on Tuesday night in the
championship game after
the Huskies beat No. 22
Syracuse 64-51 in the other
semifinal.
The top-seeded Irish
extended a school record
with their 25th straight
victory. Only top-ranked
Baylor, which handed Notre
Dame its only loss this sea-
son, has a longer active win-
ning streak.
Shoni Schimmel scored 20
points and Sara Hammond
added 12 to lead the
Cardinals (24-8).
NO. 3 CONNECTICUT 64,
NO. 22 SYRACUSE 51
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP)
— Breanna Stewart and
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis
each scored 14 points to
lead UConn into the Big
East tournament champion-
ship game with a win over
Syracuse.
The Huskies (29-3) will
face Notre Dame on Tuesday
Notre Dame downs Louisville; Baylor
wins 3rd straight Big 12 championship
Warren Wilson eCho Photo
Bremen grad Greg Neeley, posing with
the USCAA DII championship trophy and
championship game net after guiding
Warren Wilson to its first-ever national title.
See Yeo, Page A6
mCt Photo
Baylor Bears center Brittney Griner (42) goes up for a shot over Iowa State Cyclones Anna
Prins (55) and Chelsea Poppens (33) during the women’s Big 12 Championship game in
Dallas, Texas, Monday.
See Downs, Page A6
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Page A6
Sports
night for the title. The teams
have met in the conference
championship game six
times, including the past
two, and UConn has won
each time.
Still, the Irish have had
the Huskies’ number like
no other team. Notre Dame
has won six of the past seven
meetings since losing to the
Huskies in the 2011 Big East
title game and also won a
thrilling triple-overtime
game against the Huskies
last Monday night.
Kayla Alexander scored
14 to lead the Orange (24-7).
BIG 12 TOURNAMENT
No. 1 BAYLOR 75,
No. 23 IOWA STATE 47
DALLAS (AP) — Brittney
Griner scored 31 points and
top-ranked Baylor won its
third consecutive Big 12
tournament championship,
rolling past No. 23 Iowa
State 75-47 Monday night.
In a matchup of the Big
12’s top two seeds, the Lady
Bears (32-1) and their 6-foot-
8 senior star easily earned
another trophy in their dom-
inating run through the con-
ference. Now the defending
national champions can turn
their attention toward the
biggest prize.
Griner, already a two-
time All-American, had 23
points by halftime, outscor-
ing Iowa State by 10 on our
own. Odyssey Sims added
20 points for Baylor.
Anna Prins had 20 points
for the Cyclones (23-8) in
their first Big 12 title game
since 2007.
Along with the last three
Big 12 tournament titles,
Baylor has gone undefeated
through the league the last
two regular seasons for a
49-game conference winning
streak.
rebounds and three blocks
as the No. 10 Trojans defeat-
ed No. 4 Pioneer 53-41 in
the final.
Yeo sank 13-of-17 shots
— including 3-of-5 3-point-
ers — and scored all 12 of
Triton’s points in the third
quarter in the victory over
the Panthers.
“Clay never ceases to
amaze me,” said Triton head
coach Jason Groves follow-
ing Saturday’s champion-
ship. “He’s a phenomenal
talent. He’s a once-in-a-life-
time player, and it’s a bless-
ing to coach him.”
Yeo was previously named
the Player of the Week for
his performances during the
week of Dec. 10-15 in which
he averaged 33 points over
two games, netting 37 points
in a 72-36 win over Bethany
Christian and another 29
in a 51-27 Northern State
Conference victory over
New Prairie.
Yeo was joined by Tipton
senior Mike Crawford
and Linton senior Dess
Fougerousse as winners of
the IBCA/ Subway Player of
the Week distinction for the
week of March 4-9.
This is the fifth season for
the awards program and the
first season it is presented
by Subway Restaurants
of Indiana. Boys winners
will be selected from now
through the week following
March 23.
Sports6
Home School Students
Grades 5-6-7-8
If you would like to participate in the
2013 Marshall County
Spelling Bee
April 29 • 6 p.m.
Culver Community High School
Auditorium
please contact Raeanne
Stevens at 574-842-3389 or email
stevensra@culver.k12.in.us
Deadline March 18th
Boys basketball
Semistate tickets
on sale at THS this week
BOURBON — The Triton Athletic Department will be sell-
ing tickets to the Class A Northern Semistate at Lafayette
Jefferson next Saturday this week.
Tickets are $8 each and are good for both the Triton-
Lafayette Central Catholic game scheduled for 4 p.m. ET and
the Carmel-Merrillville game slated to follow.
Semistate tickets will be sold as follows:
Tuesday - Parents of players and cheerleaders and Junior/
Senior High School Students, 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:45-4:00 - Season pass holders and gold card
holders and Triton staff members, 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Thursday - General public 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8
p.m.
Friday - General public 7:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Triton regional t-shirt
orders are due today
BOURBON — The Triton Athletic Department will is
selling regional championship t-shirts to commemorate the
Trojans’ victories over Fort Wayne Canterbury and Pioneer
at Saturday.
The shirts will be black. Orders must be turned in by 3:30
p.m. today.
Boys youth basketball
Glenn tourney for 4th-8th
graders on March 16
WALKERTON — Northern Indiana Basketball Series is
hosting a tournament for fourth through eighth grade boys
basketball teams at John Glenn on March 16. Entry fee is
$165, and there is a three-game guarantee.
The series is also hosting two more tournaments March 9
at West Noble and March 23 at Wawasee.
For more information and registration call Larry Wright
at 260-403-0115 or email him at l.wright@palelitebasketball.
com.
Softball
PYSL registration
continues this Thursday
PLYMOUTH — Registration begins next month for the
Plymouth Youth Softball League. This year the league’s earlier
registration days will be held alongside junior league baseball
to give younger athletes a guaranteed chance to play in either
rag league or t-ball, in the event that one fills up quickly.
All interested youth are encouraged to attend one of the fol-
lowing four dates and locations:
Plymouth Public Library
Thursday, March 14, from 5 - 8 p.m.
Tuesday, March 18, from 4 - 8 p.m.
Registration forms also be available at all area schools in the
front office after March 1.
Anyone who needs further information on either the reg-
istration process or who cares to inquire about volunteering
with the league, contact PYSL Board President Kelli Hays via
email at KelliFo@jeld-wen.com, or call the league’s director of
operations at 574-387-8291.
Jr. golf
PGA Junior League
Golf at Sprig O’Mint
BREMEN — Sprig O’Mint Golf Club will be participating
in a new junior golf initiative called PGA Junior League Golf
this spring.
A team league, the PGA JLG is designed to bring a little
league feel to the game of golf with teams of boys and girls,
ages 8-13 playing in five to six regular season competitions
and opportunity for advancement to post-season and all-star
teams. Players will receive team jerseys, golf balls and bag
tags as well as coaching and practice time and access to a cus-
tomized web page featuring schedules, standings and stats.
Registration fee is $125 per child, and no experience is
necessary in the learn-as-you-go league. The competitions are
two-player scrambles using a three-hole match format.
Juniors planning on participating must sign up by March
25. Signing up for the PGA Junior League will give players
access to Sprig for the entire 2013 season.
There will be additional fees for those that qualify for
regional and national tournaments.
For more info or to sign up, contact Sprig O’Mint course
professional J.D. Hull at 574-546-2640.
Youth baseball
Bremen 11, 12-year old
All-Star tryouts March 21, 23
BREMEN — The Bremen Little League will be holding try-
outs for an 11- and 12-year old all-star team Thursday, March
21 from 5 to 7 p.m., Saturday, March 23 from 4:30 to 7 p.m. and
Sunday, March 24 from 2 to 4 p.m.
The Thursday and Sunday tryouts will take place at the
Bremen major league diamond. Interested parties are asked
to attend even if weather does not permit a tryout as phone
numbers will be taken to set up an alternate tryout date.
Saturday’s tryout will be held indoors at the batting cage.
Call Jeff Swank with questions at 574-546-5001.
Sports Briefs
Yeo, cont. from Page A5
Downs, cont. from Page A5
NEW YORK (AP) — College bas-
ketball fans with fond memories of
the wild 2011 NCAA tournament may
have forgotten this fact: A mostly tran-
quil regular season led up to it, with
the four top seeds combining for just
13 loses.
Back in 2007, by contrast, the No.
1 seeds had 18 defeats among them.
Then the tournament started, and the
familiar upsets of March were almost
nowhere to be found.
College basketball analyst Clark
Kellogg would love to be calling three
weeks full of stunners this year. But he
knows it’s hardly inevitable — despite
a season when the top-ranked team
never seemed safe.
“I’ve already told a number of peo-
ple I hope it plays out the way it did
during the regular season, but there are
no guarantees,” Kellogg said Monday.
A chaotic season can turn into a tame
tournament for many reasons.
Matchups are always part of the
mystery. Some years, the top seeds find
themselves up against a string of oppo-
nents they stack up favorably against.
Other seasons, they run into a team in
an early round whose strengths seem
perfectly targeted for whatever their
weakness.
Kellogg sounded another note of
caution about why the regular sea-
son instability may not be a predictor
of true March Madness: Tournament
games are on neutral courts.
“Much of the tumult you see during
the regular season happens in confer-
ence play on the home court of the
underdog,” he said.
Still, Kellogg is expecting a topsy-
turvy tournament, evidenced by his
struggle in picking the Final Four. He
suggests that two of the top teams will
make it to Atlanta, joined by a school
from a power conference that had an
unremarkable regular season, with per-
haps a George Mason-esque squad to
round out the field.
Kellogg bases that as much on the
muddle in the middle of the brackets
as on the vulnerabilities of the highest-
ranked teams. He thinks the selection
committee will struggle to differentiate
programs for the fifth through 14th
seeds.
“Because of that, you’re going to
have some matchups that will create
high drama,” he said. “And teams that
come out of 8-9 games against certain
1s may be better positioned to move
on.”
With most conference tourneys yet
to start, the four No. 1 seeds will
total at least 16 losses when this sea-
son’s NCAA tournament opens next
week. The contenders for those spots
certainly seem very beatable, but per-
haps they will roll through the tour-
ney. Maybe Indiana will dominate once
it escapes the brutal Big Ten. Maybe
Duke is a powerhouse again with Ryan
Kelly healthy. Maybe Gonzaga really
is as good as its record despite playing
outside a power conference.
The 2007 and 2011 NCAA tourna-
ments — the two extremes of pre-
dictability in recent memory — prove
that we’re all just guessing. Six years
ago, Florida returned nearly everybody
from its national championship team,
yet hardly dominated during the regu-
lar season, losing five games.
The No. 1 ranking was held by five
different schools. Yet this led to an
NCAA tournament when perhaps the
most surprising development was the
lack of surprises.
Not counting 8-9 games, there were
just two upsets in the first round. The
worst seed in the round of 16 was a
No. 7 — not exactly Cinderella. Seven
of the final eight teams were top-two
seeds, with the lone exception a No. 3.
And Florida repeated as champion.
Four years later came the Butler-
VCU national semifinal. That season,
Duke, Ohio State, Pittsburgh and
Kansas were the top four teams in the
fourth poll, and none strayed very far
from there on the way to the No. 1
seeds.
They didn’t stick around very long
in the tourney, though. One lost in its
second game; two others were knocked
out in the round of 16. Four double-
digit seeds made the round of 16, and
no top-two seeds reached the Final
Four.
For all the talk about the opportunity
for teams from outside the power con-
ferences to make a run this year, many
of the schools being mentioned for top
seeds are established winners: Duke,
Indiana, Georgetown, Louisville,
Kansas.
And while the executives at CBS and
Turner who televise the tournament
love those buzzer-beaters that spring
major upsets, they wouldn’t mind a
few big names hanging around, too.
“Brands do matter,” Turner Sports
chief David Levy said. “It always good
to have powerhouse brands that are
in the tournament and that get them-
selves deep into the tournament.”
The tournaments that inspire the
most buzz seem to star both David and
Goliath, CBS Sports Chairman Sean
McManus said. The 2010 Duke-Butler
title game was the classic example of
that.
“It’s a combination of the big nation-
al traditional powers,” McManus said,
“and the Cinderella stories.”
Will March be madness after wild regular season?
BLOOMINGTON (AP)
— Indiana coach Tom
Crean says he has apolo-
gized to Michigan assistant
Jeff Meyer for their heated
exchange after Sunday’s
game.
Crean said during the Big
Ten coaches conference call
Monday that he apologized
to Meyer over the phone on
the way to the plane after-
ward. He said he wishes he
had “never addressed any-
thing after the heat of battle
in a game, but I did and we
move on. End of story.”
The incident happened on
the court after the Hoosiers
beat the Wolverines 72-71 for
the Big Ten title. Indianapolis
TV station WRTV showed
Crean being restrained as he
yelled at Meyer: “You know
what you did. You helped
wreck the program. You
helped wreck our program.”
Crean was hired by
Indiana in 2008 and inher-
ited a program burdened by
NCAA sanctions for viola-
tions under former coach
Kelvin Sampson. Meyer
served on Sampson’s staff
but was cleared of any major
violations.
Michigan coach John
Beilein said he did not see
the confrontation as it hap-
pened. He saw video of it
on Monday morning and
said Meyer “showed great
poise” and called him “a
great coach” who has helped
rebuild the program “brick
by brick, side by side, with
me.”
He also said, “Michigan
is always going to win with
class and they’re going to
lose with class. We’re never
going to use victory or
defeat to vent ... any frustra-
tions we’re going to have.”
Crean says he has apologized to Michigan assistant
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
NBA
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia 106, Brooklyn 97
San Antonio 105, Oklahoma City 93
Utah 103, Detroit 90
Denver 108, Phoenix 93
Golden State 92, New York 63
Tuesday’s Games
Washington at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Portland, 10 p.m.
NHL
Monday’s Games
Boston 3, Ottawa 2, SO
Los Angeles 3, Calgary 1
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Boston at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
San Jose at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Scoreboard
Nation
Page A7
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
DETROIT (AP) — Former Detroit Mayor
Kwame Kilpatrick was convicted Monday
of corruption charges, ensuring a return to
prison for a man once among the nation’s
youngest big-city leaders.
Jurors convicted Kilpatrick of a raft of
crimes, including a racketeering conspiracy
charge that carries a maximum punishment
of 20 years behind bars. He was portrayed
during a five-month trial as an unscrupu-
lous politician who took bribes, rigged con-
tracts and lived far beyond his means while
in office until fall 2008.
Kilpatrick wore a surprised, puzzled
look at times as U.S. District Judge Nancy
Edmunds read the jury’s verdict: guilty of
24 charges, not guilty on three and no con-
sensus on three more. Kilpatrick declined to
speak to reporters as he left the courthouse.
Prosecutors said Kilpatrick ran a “pri-
vate profit machine” out of Detroit’s City
Hall. The government presented evidence
to show he got a share of the spoils after
ensuring that Bobby Ferguson’s excavating
company was awarded millions in work
from the water department.
Business owners said they were forced
to hire Ferguson as a subcontractor or risk
losing city contracts. Separately, fundraiser
Emma Bell said she gave Kilpatrick more
than $200,000 as his personal cut of political
donations, pulling cash from her bra dur-
ing private meetings. A high-ranking aide,
Derrick Miller, told jurors that he often was
the middle man, passing bribes from others.
Internal Revenue Service agents said
Kilpatrick spent $840,000 beyond his may-
oral salary.
Ferguson, Kilpatrick’s pal, was also con-
victed of a racketeering conspiracy charge.
The jury could not reach a verdict on the
same charge for Kilpatrick’s father, Bernard
Kilpatrick, but convicted him of submitting
a false tax return.
Kwame Kilpatrick, who now lives near
Dallas, declined to testify. He has long
denied any wrongdoing, and defense attor-
ney James Thomas told jurors that his client
often was showered with cash gifts from
city workers and political supporters dur-
ing holidays and birthdays.
The government said Kilpatrick abused
the Civic Fund, a nonprofit fund he created
to help distressed Detroit residents. There
was evidence that it was used for yoga
lessons, camps for his kids, golf clubs and
travel.
Kilpatrick, 42, was elected in 2001 at
age 31. He resigned in 2008 and pleaded
guilty to obstruction of justice in a differ-
ent scandal involving sexually explicit text
messages and an extramarital affair with
his chief of staff.
The Democrat spent 14 months in prison
for violating probation in that case after a
judge said he failed to report assets that
could be put toward his $1 million restitu-
tion to Detroit.
Voters booted his mother, Carolyn
Cheeks Kilpatrick, from Congress in 2010,
partly because of a negative perception of
her due to her son’s troubles.
Jury convicts ex-Detroit
mayor of corruption
WARREN, Ohio (AP) — Two teens who
escaped a crash that killed six friends in a
swampy pond wriggled out of the wreckage
by smashing a rear window and swimming
away from the SUV, a state trooper said
Monday.
The inside of the sport utility vehicle was
entirely under water within minutes of the
crash, said State Highway Patrol Lt. Brian
Holt.
Investigators don’t yet know why the
eight were in the speeding vehicle without
permission when it smashed into a guard-
rail and flipped over into the pond Sunday
morning around daybreak, Holt said.
No one in the group had asked to take
the vehicle and its owner was not related to
any of the teens, Holt said. The vehicle was
licensed to a resident of Youngstown, about
20 miles away.
“That’s all we know right now,” he said.
The two teens who escaped have talked
with investigators, Holt said. The two boys
ran a quarter-mile to a home to call 911, the
highway patrol said.
Investigators were focused on speed as a
key factor in the crash and said weather did
not play a role.
While citing an unspecified “high rate”
of speed, investigators wouldn’t speculate
on whether alcohol or drugs were involved
in the crash on a two-lane road snugged
between guardrails in an industrial section
of the city.
“I can’t believe you’re gone,” Mariah
Bryant, 12, wrote in a message taped to a
stuffed bear at the scene in memory of her
half-brother, Daylan Ray, 15, who was killed.
“I love and miss you so much,” said the
message, which drew a steady stream of
onlookers. The bear was part of a growing
memorial of stuffed animals at the roadside.
Deanna Behner said her 15-year-old son
and the other teenagers were close friends
who lived in the same neighborhood on the
east side of Warren, Youngstown TV stations
WKBN and WYTV reported. Behner told the
stations that authorities unsuccessfully tried
for hours to save her son, Kirklan Behner.
The Honda Passport veered off the left
side of a road and overturned about 60 miles
east of Cleveland, State Highway Patrol Lt.
Anne Ralston said. Investigators say it came
to rest upside down in the swamp and sank
with five of the victims trapped inside. A
sixth, who was thrown from the SUV dur-
ing the crash, was found under it when the
vehicle was taken out of the water.
Holt said Sunday evening that speed was
a factor, although investigators were still
trying to determine the speed at the time of
the accident.
“We will not be speculating on alco-
hol and-or drug usage pending toxicology
reports,” Holt said.
At an impound lot where the wreckage
was taken, with windows smashed and
extensive damage to the front end, hood
and roof.
Ralston didn’t know where the teens were
headed when the crash happened and Holt
said later it wasn’t clear how long they had
been out.
“All I know is my baby is gone,” said
Derrick Ray, who came to the crash site after
viewing his 15-year-old son Daylan’s body
at the county morgue. He said he knew that
his son, a talented football player who was
looking forward to playing in high school,
was out with friends, but didn’t know their
plans.
Warren Fire Department Capt. Bill
Monrean said a cold water rescue team was
deployed to the scene and got five teens out
of the submerged vehicle.
“Being a cold water rescue situation, cold
water extends life,” Monrean told AP Radio.
“We knew we had a chance; even being in
there a while.”
Two of the teens, both 15, were brought
to a hospital in full cardiac arrest, St. Joseph
Health Center nursing supervisor Julie Gill
said, and were pronounced dead there. She
said they were treated for hypothermic
drowning trauma, indicating they had been
submerged in cold water.
The two survivors, 18-year-old Brian
Henry and 15-year-old Asher Lewis, both of
Warren, were treated for bruising and other
injuries and released, she said.
All those killed were ages 14 to 19, author-
ities said. State police identified the others
as the 19-year-old driver Alexis Cayson;
Andrique Bennett, 14; Brandon Murray, 14;
and Kirklan Behner, Ramone White and Ray,
all 15. The Highway Patrol said Cayson was
the only female in the vehicle.
Rickie Bowling, 18, a friend of Behner,
sobbed at the crash scene as she recalled his
playfulness and reputation as a cut-up.
“He was one of a kind,” she said.
“Everyone knew him in the neighborhood.
In school, he always made everyone laugh.”
Officials opened a school where several of
the victims attended to provide counseling
for families Sunday night. Superintendent
Michael Notar called the crowded closed-
door session heartbreaking and said coun-
selors would be available again Monday in
schools.
Cheryl Moore, 54, whose nephew is a
classmate of some of the victims, emerged
from the counseling session and said it was
helpful. “I just feel we have to come to grips
with what happened today,” she said.
All eight were from Warren.
Warren, located near the Pennsylvania
state line, is a mostly blue-collar city that
was hit by the decline of U.S. steel mills. It
has more than 41,000 residents in the indus-
trial Mahoning Valley region.
Highway patrol: 2 survivors
swam out of Ohio crash
NEW YORK (AP) — Jay Victorino was
standing outside his mother’s apartment
when he was grabbed by police, and he
says if she hadn’t come downstairs to
identify him he would’ve been arrested on
a trespassing charge.
That’s because his mother’s South
Bronx building is one of thousands of
private dwellings patrolled by the New
York Police Department under a program
known as Operation Clean Halls.
Victorino, 28, has mixed feelings about
the program — on one hand, he has seen
his neighborhood become safer. On the
other, he doesn’t think it’s right to be tar-
geted.
“I don’t want to be stopped,” he said.
“But I also don’t want something bad to
happen to my family. It’s not easy to say
what the right answer is. ... It’s not a per-
fect world.”
His ambivalence was echoed by doz-
ens of people around the city who live
in buildings enrolled in the program, the
only one of its kind in a major U.S. city
that gives police standing permission to
roam the halls of private buildings. Some
residents say they feel safer, while others
say they believe they are being harassed at
home and, in some cases, illegally stopped
and arrested. More than a dozen residents
have filed a federal lawsuit saying their
civil rights were violated.
“We don’t feel safe, but it’s because of
the police,” said Jaenean Ligon, one of the
plaintiffs, who said her sons have been
wrongly arrested.
Operation Clean Halls started in
Manhattan in the 1990s, when crime was at
an all-time high and some private building
owners felt overwhelmed with wrongdo-
ing inside their properties. Now, there are
more than 3,000 participating buildings
around the city, mostly in higher-crime
areas such as the South Bronx. To enroll,
a building owner or manager signs paper-
work allowing police to enter and arrest
people found to be committing crimes.
Edifices citywide are dotted with small
white square signs alerting residents that
their homes are patrolled by police. Some
are huge complexes, others are small
brownstones. Officers have conducted
hundreds of thousands of patrols up and
down stairwells and even more outside.
They catch drug transactions, shoo away
loiterers and break up fights, residents say.
“It’s good for us. It’s great. We love it.
Otherwise, people are in the hallways
all the time up to no good,” 77-year-old
Courtney Campbell said, recalling a time
when people would urinate in her hall.
But others say they can’t go home with-
out being menaced. In August 2011, Ligon
sent her teenage son to the corner store get
ketchup for the fries she was making for
dinner. He didn’t return.
Eventually, a police officer rang her
doorbell and told her over the intercom to
come down and identify her boy.
“I thought he was dead,” she said. “I ran
down the stairs, and when I saw him there,
I just collapsed.”
Ligon said her son later was arrested on
a trespassing charge but the charge was
dropped.
“I want the harassment to stop,” she
said. “It’s not right.”
The lawsuit is one of three pending
federal cases that involve the New York
Police Department’s stop, question and
frisk practice, championed by police
Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Mayor
Michael Bloomberg as a necessary crime-
fighting measure that has helped the
nation’s biggest city reach historically low
crime rates in recent years. There were
only 414 killings citywide last year, com-
pared with 2,245 in 1990.
Kelly has called the practice a lifesaving
tool that deters criminals from taking ille-
gal weapons in public. Bloomberg invoked
the toll of gun violence to defend the prac-
tice in his last State of the City address.
But with the steady uptick in the number
of people stopped has come an increased
chorus of complaints, including some from
people who say they’ve been targeted
because of their race. Last year, New York
police stopped 533,042 people, more than
five times the number in 2002. Fifty-five
percent of those stopped were black, 32
percent were Hispanic and 10 percent
were white. According to U.S. Census
figures, there are 8.2 million people in the
city: 26 percent are black, 28 percent are
Hispanic and 44 percent are white.
The Clean Halls lawsuit was filed by the
New York Civil Liberties Union and Bronx
Defenders on behalf of Ligon and others
who live in South Bronx apartment build-
ings enrolled in the program.
Another plaintiff, Abdullah Turner,
who’s black, said he was waiting for a
friend who was returning a sweater inside
a Bronx building when an officer slapped
his cellphone out of his hand and demand-
ed to know what he was doing outside.
Turner, 25, said he was arrested on a tres-
passing charge, which was dropped nearly
six months later.
“I never thought anything bad about
police growing up, until I got older,” said
Turner, who recently got a GED and is in
a work training program. “I guess my age
and my race played a part in now putting
me on their radar, rather than being my
father’s son.”
The trespass charge on which Turner
was arrested is among the most common
in the city. Last year there were about 8,700
arrests on it, and the year before there
were more than 9,200. About a thousand of
last year’s cases have been dismissed, and
more than 2,100 from the year before were
dismissed in some form, according to sta-
tistics from the state Division of Criminal
Justice Services.
The lead attorney on the Clean Halls
lawsuit, Alexis Karteron, said the “aggres-
sive assault” on residents’ rights must be
stopped.
“What comes from the Operation Clean
Halls case is going to result in a major step
toward dismantling the NYPD’s out of
control stop and frisk practices,” she said.
U.S. District Court Judge Shira
Scheindlin ruled this year that changes
to the program must be made, but she
reserved judgment on what those changes
will be until the other stop and frisk cases
are heard.
The second pending case deals with
stops in public housing. The third, which
challenges the practice in general, goes to
trial this month.
Scheindlin said that police have system-
atically crossed the line when making tres-
pass stops outside Clean Halls buildings.
“For those of us who do not fear being
stopped as we approach or leave our own
homes or those of our friends and fami-
lies,” she said, “it is difficult to believe that
residents ... live under such a threat.”
NYPD program patrols
inside private buildings
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World
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Page A8
VATICAN CITY (AP) — On the eve of their conclave to
select a new pope, cardinals held their final debate Monday
over whether the Catholic Church needs a manager to clean
up the Vatican or a pastor to inspire the faithful at a time
of crisis.
The countdown underway, speculation has gone into
overdrive about who’s ahead in the papal campaign.
Will cardinals choose Cardinal Angelo Scola, the arch-
bishop of Milan, an Italian with serious intellectual and
managerial chops who hasn’t been tainted by the scandals
of the Vatican bureaucracy?
Or has Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the Capuchin monk from
Boston who has charmed the Italian media worked the same
magic on fellow cardinals?
Most cardinals already knew Canadian Cardinal Marc
Ouellet since he heads a powerful Vatican office. But maybe
over the past week they’ve gotten a chance to hear him
sing — he has a fabulous voice and is known for belting out
French folk songs.
Whoever it is, there were strong indications that plenty
of questions remained about the state of the church and the
best man to lead it heading into today’s conclave: Not all the
cardinals who wanted to speak were able to Monday, and
the cardinals were forced to take a vote about continuing the
discussion into the afternoon.
In the end, a majority of cardinals chose to cut short the
formal discussion, and the cardinals who did speak short-
ened their comments, according to the Vatican spokesman
the Rev. Federico Lombardi.
“This is a great historical moment but we have got to do it
properly, and I think that’s why there isn’t a real rush to get
into things,” Cardinal Wilfrid Fox Napier from South Africa
said as he left the session.
Cardinal Javier Luis Errázuriz of Chile was more blunt,
saying that while Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger had tremen-
dous support going into the 2005 conclave that elected him
Benedict XVI after just four ballots, the same can’t be said
for any of the candidates in this election.
“This time around, there are many different candidates,
so it’s normal that it’s going to take longer than the last
time,” he told The Associated Press.
One of the main presentations Monday came from
Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the Vatican No. 2 who heads the
commission of cardinals overseeing the scandal-marred
Vatican bank. He outlined the bank’s activities and the Holy
See’s efforts to clean up its reputation in international finan-
cial circles, Lombardi said.
The Holy See’s finances, and particularly the work of
the Vatican bank have been under the spotlight during
these pre-conclave meetings as cardinals seek to investigate
allegations of corruption in the Vatican administration and
get to the bottom of the bank’s long history of scandal and
secrecy.
There’s no clear front-runner for a job most cardinals say
they would never want, but a handful of names are circulat-
ing as top candidates to lead the 1.2 billion-strong church at
a critical time in its history.
Scola is affable and Italian, but not from the Italian-centric
Vatican bureaucracy. That makes him attractive perhaps
to those seeking reform of the nerve center of the Catholic
Church, which was exposed as corrupt and full of petty turf
battles by the leaks of papal documents last year.
Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Scherer seems to be favored by
some Latin Americans and the Vatican Curia, or bureau-
cracy. Scherer has a solid handle on the Vatican’s finances,
sitting on the governing commission of the Vatican bank,
the Institute for Religious Works, as well as the Holy See’s
main budget committee.
As a non-Italian, the archbishop of Sao Paolo would be
expected to name an Italian insider as secretary of state —
the Vatican No. 2 who runs day-to-day affairs at the Holy
See — another plus for Vatican-based cardinals who would
want one of their own running the shop.
The pastoral camp seems to be focusing on two Americans,
Cardinals Timothy Dolan of New York and O’Malley.
Neither has Vatican experience, though Dolan served in the
1990s as rector of the Pontifical North American College, the
U.S. seminary up the hill from the Vatican. He has admit-
ted his Italian isn’t strong — perhaps a handicap for a job
in which the lingua franca of day-to-day administration is
Italian and the pope’s other role as bishop of Rome.
If the leading names fail to reach the 77 votes required for
victory in the first few rounds of balloting, any number of
surprise names could come to the fore as alternatives.
Those include Cardinal Luis Tagle, archbishop of Manila.
He is young — at age 55 the second-youngest cardinal vot-
ing — and was only named a cardinal last November. While
his management skills haven’t been tested in Rome, Tagle
— with a Chinese-born mother — is seen as the face of the
church in Asia, where Catholicism is growing.
Whoever it is, the new pope will face a church in cri-
sis: Benedict XVI spent his eight-year pontificate trying
to revive Catholicism from the secular trends which have
made it almost irrelevant in places like Europe, once a
stronghold of Christianity. Clerical sex abuse scandals have
soured many faithful on their church, and competition from
rival evangelical churches in Latin America and Africa has
drawn souls away.
Today begins with the cardinals checking into the
Vatican’s Domus Sanctae Martae, a modern, industrial-feel
hotel on the edge of the Vatican gardens. While the rooms
are impersonal, they’re a step up from the cramped condi-
tions cardinals faced before the hotel was first put to use in
2005; in conclaves past, lines in the Apostolic Palace used to
form for using bathrooms.
This morning, the dean of the College of Cardinals,
Angelo Sodano, leads the celebration of the “Pro eligendo
Pontificie” Mass — the Mass for the election of a pope —
inside St. Peter’s Basilica, joined by the 115 cardinals who
will vote.
They break for lunch at the hotel, and return for the 4:30
p.m. procession into the Sistine Chapel, chanting the Litany
of Saints, the hypnotic Gregorian chant imploring the inter-
cession of the saints to help guide the voting. They then take
their oath of secrecy and listen to a meditation by elderly
Maltese Cardinal Prosper Grech.
While the cardinals are widely expected to cast the first
ballot Tuesday afternoon, technically they don’t have to.
In conclaves past, the cardinals have always voted on the
first day.
The first puffs of smoke from the Sistine Chapel chimney
should emerge sometime around 8 p.m. Black smoke from
the burned ballot papers means no pope. White smoke
means the 266th pope has been chosen.
Cardinals count down to conclave with final talks
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean state media
said Monday that Pyongyang had carried through with a
threat to cancel the 60-year-old armistice that ended the
Korean War, as it and South Korea staged dueling war
games amid threatening rhetoric that has risen to the high-
est level since North Korea rained artillery shells on a South
Korean island in 2010.
Enraged over the South’s joint military drills with the
United States and recent U.N. sanctions, Pyongyang has
piled threat on top of threat, including vows to launch a
nuclear strike on the U.S. Seoul has responded with tough
talk of its own and has placed its troops on high alert.
The North Korean government made no formal announce-
ment Monday on its repeated threats to scrap the armistice,
but the country’s main newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, report-
ed that the armistice was nullified Monday as Pyongyang
had earlier announced it would.
The North followed through on another promise Monday,
shutting down a Red Cross hotline that the North and South
used for general communication and to discuss aid ship-
ments and separated families’ reunions.
The 11-day military drills that started Monday involve
10,000 South Korean and about 3,000 American troops.
Those coincide with two months of separate U.S.-South
Korean field exercises that began March 1.
The drills are held annually, and this year, according to
South Korean media, the “Key Resolve” drill rehearses dif-
ferent scenarios for a possible conflict on the Korean pen-
insula using computer-simulated exercises. The U.S. and
South Korean troops will be used to test the scenarios.
Also continuing are large-scale North Korean drills that
Seoul says involve the army, navy and air force. The South
Korean defense ministry said there have been no military
activities it considers suspicious.
The North has threatened to nullify the armistice several
times in times of tension with the outside world, and in 1996
the country sent hundreds of armed troops into a border vil-
lage. The troops later withdrew.
Despite the heightened tension, there were signs of busi-
ness as usual Monday.
The two Koreas continue to have at least two working
channels of communication between their militaries and
aviation authorities.
One of those hotlines was used Monday to give hundreds
of South Koreans approval to enter North Korea to go to
work. Their jobs are at the only remaining operational sym-
bol of joint inter-Korean cooperation, the Kaesong industrial
complex. It is operated in North Korea with South Korean
money and knowhow and a mostly North Korean work
force.
The North Korean rhetoric escalated as the U.N. Security
Council last week approved a new round of sanctions over
Pyongyang’s latest nuclear weapons test Feb. 12.
SKorea, US begin drills as NKorea threatens war
Comm/Class8
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continued on page A10
116
Legals
STATE OF INDIANA
IN THE MARSHALL
CIRCUIT COURT
TERRY A. PRICE,
Plaintiff,
v.
CARLA J. RENCA-
TORE, R & F RENT-
ALS, LLC, and ALL
UNKNOWN DEFEN-
DANTS Being All Per-
sons Who Have or
Claim to Have an Inter-
est in or Lien Against
the Real Property
Herein,
Defendants.
Cause Number
50C01-1303-PL-7
SUMMONS BY
PUBLICATION
To: All Unknown De-
fendants:
Any person who has
or claims to have an in-
terest in or a lien
against the real prop-
erty described as fol-
lows:
Beginning in the cen-
ter of what is known as
the "Plymouth-Laporte
Trail" 644 feet North 46
degrees West of the
Southeast corner of
the Northeast Quarter
of the Northwest Quar-
ter of Section 6, Town-
ship 34 North, Range 1
East; thence South 37
degrees West 108 feet
on the centerline of the
Schroeder ditch, the
place of beginning;
thence Southerly on
centerline of said ditch
221 feet to the center-
line of a private dredge
ditch; thence North-
westerly on the center-
line of said private
dredge ditch 225 feet;
thence North 63 de-
grees East 214 feet;
thence North 83 de-
grees East 125 feet to
116
Legals
the place of beginning.
Subject to legal high-
ways.
is hereby given notice
that on or about the 6th
day of March, 2013.
Terry A. Price, Plain-
tiff, filed a Verified
Complaint to Quiet Ti-
tle to Real Property in
the Marshall Circuit
Court, in Price vs.
Hale, et al. under
C a u s e N o .
50C01-1303-PL-7
The i dent i t y and
whereabouts of such
persons is unknown to
the Plaintiff.
The name and ad-
dress of the attorney
representing the Plain-
tiff is Adam K. Luken-
bill (27233-50), Attor-
ney of the law firm of
Lukenbill & Lukenbill,
LLP, 501 East Jeffer-
son Street, Plymouth,
Indiana 46563.
This action is a com-
plaint to quiet title sub-
sequent to the issu-
ance of a tax deed, in
which any and all par-
ties having or claiming
to have an, interest in
or a lien against the
real property must as-
sert said claim.
All unknown claimants
being sued and notified
herein must respond
within thirty (30) days
after the last notice of
the action is published.
In the case that you as
unknown claimant do
not respond herein by
written answer or oth-
erwise, a judgment by
default may be entered
against you for the re-
lief demanded in the
complaint.
Dated this 7th day of
March, 2013.
116
Legals
Julie Fox, Clerk
LUKENBILL & LUKEN-
BILL , LLP
By
Adam K. Lukenbill
(Attorney No.
27233-50)
501 East Jefferson
Street, P.O. Box 1508
Plymouth, Indiana
46563
Attorneys for Plaintiff
March 12,19,26, 2013 PN9713
UNITED STATES
DISTRICT COURT
NORTHERN
DISTRICT OF
INDIANA
SOUTH BEND
DIVISION
CASE NO: 3:12CV106
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA,
Plaintiff,
v.
PAMELA PINKOWSKI,
CITY OF PLYMOUTH,
INDIANA CARPEN-
TERS FEDERAL
CREDI T UNI ON,
N/ K/ A, MI DWEST
CARPENTERS AND
MILLWRIGHTS FED-
ERAL CREDIT UN-
ION, PAUL SIDDALL,
JR., AND DAWN SID-
DALL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
MARSHAL'S SALE
Notice is hereby given
that pursuant to an or-
der of foreclosure and
sale of real estate en-
tered by the United
States District Court for
the Northern District of
Indiana, South Bend
Division, on the 23rd
day of January, 2013,
in this cause, the un-
der si gned Uni t ed
States Marshal for the
Northern District of In-
diana, will conduct a
public sale at the Mar-
116
Legals
shall County Court-
house, Plymouth, Indi-
ana, on the 9th day of
April, 2013 at 12:00
noon, p.m., (local
time), of the following
described real estate:
LOT NUMBERED
THREE ( 3) AS
SHOWN ON THE RE-
CORDED PLAT OF
RIVERSIDE MEAD-
OWS PLANNED UNIT
DEVELOPMENT,
SECTION ONE, RE-
CORDED ON SEP-
TEMBER 6, 2007, IN
THE OFFICE OF THE
RECORDER OF MAR-
SHALL COUNTY, IN-
DIANA, AS INSTRU-
M E N T N O .
200705855.
Commonly Known As:
1231 Ed Cook Blvd.,
Plymouth, Indiana
46563.
This public sale will be
made without relief
from valuation or ap-
praisement laws and
the property shall be
sold as an entirety.
The United States Mar-
shal will accept, and
seek court confirmation
of, the highest bid of-
fered for this property.
The successful bidder
must tender payment
in the form of a cash-
ier's or certified check
or money order, on
such terms as the Mar-
shal directs. The pur-
chaser shall receive a
deed thereto after
court confirmation of
the sale, subject to the
express conditions that
there are no warranties
of title. The interest ac-
quired by the pur-
chaser at said sale
shall be subject to any
l i en of Mar shal l
116
Legals
County, Indiana for
real property taxes in
regard to said real es-
tate, and further sub-
ject to any lien of a mu-
nicipality for sewer
fees assessed against
the real estate, which
lien is duly and prop-
erly recorded in the re-
corder's office in the
county in which the
real estate is located
prior to delivery of the
deed to the purchaser.
For further particulars
regarding this sale,
prospective bidders
are hereby referred to
the order of the United
States District Court in
the above-captioned
case.
Myron M. Sutton
United States Marshal
Northern District of
Indiana
March 5,12,29,26, 2012
PN7676
STATE OF INDIANA
IN THE MARSHALL
CIRCUIT COURT
TERRY A. PRICE,
Plaintiff,
v.
CLYDE P. HALE, Jr.
and ALL UNKNOWN
DEFENDANTS, Being
All Persons Who Have
or Claim to Have an In-
terest i n or Li en
Against the Real Prop-
erty Herein,
Defendants
Cause Number
50C01-1303-PL-8
SUMMONS BY
PUBLICATION
To: All Unknown De-
fendants:
Any person who has or
claims to have an inter-
est in or a lien against
the real property de-
scribed as follows;
Beginning at the brass
116
Legals
monument at the inter-
section of the north line
of Section 6, Township
34 North, Range 1
East, Polk Township,
Marshall County, Indi-
ana, with the centerline
of the Plymouth-La-
Porte Trail; thence
South 17 degrees 53
minutes 51 seconds
East on said center-
line, 683.52 feet to the
Point of beginning;
t hence cont i nui ng
South 17 degrees 53
minutes 51 seconds
East on said center-
line, 83.90 feet to a
P.K. nail; thence South
32 degrees 08 minutes
13 seconds East,
45.25 feet to a P.K.
nail; thence South 27
degrees 26 minutes 20
seconds East, all on
said centerline, 28.98
feet to a railroad spike;
thence South 89 de-
grees 23 minutes 40
seconds West, 88,66
feet to a well point;
thence South 33 de-
grees 04 minutes 29
seconds West, 157.27
feet to a capped 1/2"
rebar; thence South 66
degrees 10 minutes 21
seconds West, 220.26
feet to the centerline of
a drai nage di tch;
thence North 62 de-
grees 34 minutes 38
seconds West along
said ditch centerline,
464.42 feet to the
south line of the north
49 rods of the North-
east Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of
said Section 6; thence
West on said south
line, 57.37 feet to a 1"
iron pipe on the west
line of the Northwest
Quarter of said Section
116
Legals
6; thence North 01 de-
gree 05 minutes 56
seconds East on the
said west line, 157.94
feet to a 1" iron pipe;
t hence due East
780.96 feet to the point
of beginning. Subject
to legal highways.
is hereby given notice
that on or about the 6th
day of March, 2013,
Terry A. Price, Plaintiff,
filed a Verified Com-
plaint to Quiet Title to
Real Property in the
Marshall Circuit Court,
in Price vs. Hale, et al.
under Cause No.
50C01-1303-PL-8.
The i dent i t y and
whereabouts of such
persons is unknown to
the Plaintiff.
The name and ad-
dress of the attorney
representing the Plain-
tiff is Adam K. Luken-
bill (27233-50), Attor-
ney, of the law firm of
Lukenbill & Lukenbill,
LLP, 501 East Jeffer-
son Street, Plymouth,
Indiana 46563.
This action is a com-
plaint to quiet title sub-
sequent to the issu-
ance of a tax deed, in
which any and all par-
ties having or claiming
to have an interest in
or a lien against the
real property must as-
sert said claim.
All unknown claimants
being sued and notified
herein must respond
within thirty (30) days
after the last notice of
the action is published.
In the case that you as
unknown claimant do
no respond herein by
written answer or oth-
erwise, a judgment by
default may be entered
116
Legals
against you for the re-
lief demanded in the
complaint.
Dated this 7th day of
March, 2013.
Julie A. Fox
Clerk
LUKENBILL & LUKEN-
BILL/ LLP
By Adam K. Lukenbill
(Attorney No.
27233-50)
501 East Jefferson St.
P.O. Box 1508
Plymouth, Indiana
46563
Attorneys for Plaintiff
March 12,19,26, 2013 PN9727
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
City of Plymouth,
Indiana
River Park Square
Notice is hereby given
that the City of Ply-
mouth, Indiana, by and
through its Redevelop-
ment Commi ssi on,
hereinafter referred to
as the Owner, will re-
ceive sealed bids for
the City of Plymouth
River Park Square Pro-
ject at the Office of the
Clerk-Treasurer of the
City of Plymouth, City
Hall, 124 North Michi-
gan Street, Plymouth,
Indiana 46563.
Sealed bids are invited
and may be forwarded
by registered mail or
delivered in person,
addressed to the City
of Plymouth, in care of
the Clerk-Treasurer by
no later than 4:30 pm
(local time) and will be
considered by the Re-
development Commis-
sion at a public meet-
ing called to open such
bids at 5:30 pm (local
time) on Tuesday, April
2, 2013 at the Council
Chambers of the City
Subscribe
To
Marshall
County’s
Community
News Source
today!
Call
1-800-933-0356
Or
visit our office
214 N. Michigan
Downtown Plymouth
Fun & Advice
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I read the
letter you ran on Dec. 21 from “Dateless in
Dayton.” We have a few thoughts on the
matter we’d like to share with him and
anyone else who is having bad luck getting
responses on dating websites.
We are middle-
aged and have
been together
for two years.
Even though we
deactivated our
memberships in
the dating sites
we were part
of, we still get
emails daily that
“’So-and-So’ sent
you a message.”
It appears these
sites still show our profiles as active, allow-
ing people to try to contact us. So it’s entire-
ly possible that the women “Dateless” has
contacted were inactive or expired members
who were never able to see his messages.
We would like to reassure “Dateless” that
the problem may not be him. We would also
like to encourage him not to give up on find-
ing a mate. He needs to get out there and do
the things he loves because he may end up
meeting someone that way. If he covers all his
bases and is himself, he’ll do OK. — HOPING
TO BE HELPFUL, HUNTSVILLE, ALA.
DEAR HELPFUL: Many readers wrote
to point out that the problem “Dateless”
is experiencing could be more about the
idiosyncratic subscription rules on some
dating websites than about the writer or the
women he is contacting. Other experienced
users shared their stories:
DEAR ABBY: I can tell “Dateless” why
he’s not getting “thanks, but no thanks”
notes from the women he contacts on the
online dating service: Those women are
most likely overwhelmed with responses.
Before I met my husband 10 years ago,
I signed up on a dating site, then left the
house to run some errands. When I came
back a couple of hours later, I had 75
responses! I tried to answer all of them, but
I kept getting more and more, so I finally
gave up. I can only imagine how many
responses women get today with online
dating even more popular than it was then.
— SETTLED DOWN IN ILLINOIS
DEAR ABBY: How long does one have
to wait before determining the person isn’t
interested or just hasn’t had the chance to
respond? Many sites offer a simple button
push that sends a message saying you are
not interested. It appears people are sim-
ply taking the easy way out without any
concern for others. And unfortunately, this
doesn’t happen only in online dating. —
DAVID IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR ABBY: I’d like to suggest that
“Dateless” consider that many people don’t
check their dating site often — or ever. I
signed up on a site in August and stopped
looking at it in October. Then I forgot my
password and could never look again. —
OVER IT IN TAMPA
Readers’ advice for those discouraged by online dating
Blondie
Dustin
Dear Abby
BY JEANNE PHILLIPS
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Page A9
Tiger mommie dearest
It’s been more than 30
years since Faye Dunaway
as Joan Crawford shouted,
“No wire hangers!” at her
daughter Christina, making
“Mommie Dearest” short-
hand for an overcontrolling
mother. And now the book
“Battle Hymn of the Tiger
Mother” has replaced that
movie as the pop-culture ID
for demanding moms. Seems
like parents are still trying
to find the balance between
protecting and (s)mothering
their children.
We hear from a lot of young
adults and teenagers who
feel they are overcontrolled
by “helicopter parenting.”
And a new study shows that
when teens aren’t allowed to
BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D.,
AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
take responsibility for every-
day decisions or challeng-
ing situations, they’re more
likely to be depressed, to feel
incompetent and to abuse
prescription pain relievers.
It’s estimated that around 8
percent to 10 percent of kids
on college campuses take
them for nonmedical pur-
poses. So, how do you keep
your almost-adult kids safe
without blunting their matu-
rity or happiness?
Most important: Express
your affection wholeheart-
edly. That fosters self-con-
fidence and security. Love
reduces kids’ stress, boosts
overall health and gives
them confidence to take your
advice and find their own
way to handle life’s chal-
lenges. Giving directives
without affection can make
a child feel that you’re try-
ing to control them. They
will react negatively. (You’ll
find more advice in our book
“YOU: The Owner’s Manual
for Teens.”)
Once you’ve made your
point, back off: Don’t be their
BFF online. You can moni-
tor younger kids’ Internet
exchanges, but once they’re
old enough to vote, you’re
done with that! Now, have
some fun with all that extra
time!
Hints From Heloise and Sudoku every day in the Classifeds
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By Fifi Rodriguez
Questions:
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country is Mount Ararat
located?
2. LITERATURE: Who
wrote the novel “The Color
Purple”?
3. DANCE: Who wrote the
score for the American ballet
“Rodeo”?
4. U.S. PRESIDENTS:
Which president served as a
congressman in the House of
Representatives after finish-
ing his presidential term?
5. HISTORY: What was the
year of the first Thanksgiving
feast in the New World?
6. MEASUREMENTS: How
many inches are in a hand?
7. MEDICAL: What is a
common name for the medi-
cal condition alopecia?
Answers
1. Turkey
2. Alice Walker
3. Aaron Copland
4. John Quincy Adams
5. 1621
6. Four inches
7. Baldness
(c) 2013 King Features
Synd., Inc.
Chuckle of the day...
When I said I wanted to live life in the fast lane, I didn’t mean the
one with oncoming traffic.
Classifieds
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Page A10
continued from page A8
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Manager. This is a full-time, salaried leadership position with
competitive pay and excellent benefits. Applications can be requested by
mail, phone, fax or email, and should be submitted by March 20, 2013.
PHJC Ministry Center,
Attn: Human Resources,
P.O. Box 1, Donaldson,
Indiana 46513
Phone: 574-936-9936
Fax: 574-935-1735
E-mail: hr@poorhandmaids.org EOE
LOOKING FOR A
SUMMER JOB?
Culver Marina, Maxinkuckee Boardshop and the
Boardwalk Bar & Grill is the place.We are looking for
honest, personable help. Willing to show-up and
work. Must work weekends and summer holidays.
Job openings include the following:
CULVER MARINA
Service Department
MAXINKUCKEE BOARDSHOP
Retail Salespersons • Dock Staff
BOARDWALK BAR & GRILL
Experienced Bartenders • Wait Staff
Kitchen Positions • Bus Staff
Contact Culver Marina for Application, stop in for
Application form, or go online to culvermarina.com.
Must be 18 years old to apply.
Culver Marina
3000 East Shore Drive • Culver, IN 46511
(574) 842-3375 • www.culvermarina.com
GENERAL DENTAL OFFICE IN PLYMOUTH
is seeking an expanded function dental assistant to work full-time.
No experience required. Must have a positive attitude, be independent and
willing to work well with others. Benefits include: paid vacation and holidays,
401K plus matching and profit sharing. Wage will be commensurate with
experience. Position available immediately.
Reply to Box 311, PO Box 220, Plymouth, IN 46563
SEASONAL AGRONOMY
OPERATIONS ASSOCIATES
North Central Co-op, Bremen,
Inwood & Nappanee.
Seasonal positions.
Duties: truck driving, warehousing, maintenance.
Prefer Class B CDL - air brakes, tanker
or ability to obtain Ag CDL.
Able to pass drug test.
Able to pass NCC driving record check.
Retirees welcome.
APPLY: On-line www.ncc.coop Job #6312-B
116
Legals
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
City of Plymouth,
Indiana
River Park Square
Notice is hereby given
that the City of Ply-
mouth, Indiana, by and
through its Redevelop-
ment Commi ssi on,
hereinafter referred to
as the Owner, will re-
ceive sealed bids for
the City of Plymouth
River Park Square Pro-
ject at the Office of the
Clerk-Treasurer of the
City of Plymouth, City
Hall, 124 North Michi-
gan Street, Plymouth,
Indiana 46563.
Sealed bids are invited
and may be forwarded
by registered mail or
delivered in person,
addressed to the City
of Plymouth, in care of
the Clerk-Treasurer by
no later than 4:30 pm
(local time) and will be
considered by the Re-
development Commis-
sion at a public meet-
ing called to open such
bids at 5:30 pm (local
time) on Tuesday, April
2, 2013 at the Council
Chambers of the City
Building, 124 N. Michi-
gan St. (Garro Street
entrance), Plymouth,
Indiana, 46563. Pro-
posals received by the
Clerk-Treasurer after
4:30 pm (local time)
shall be returned un-
opened. The bidder
shall be responsible to
make sure that the
bids are mailed or oth-
erwise delivered to the
Clerk-Treasurer before
said time. One final
call for bids shall be
made prior to the
opening of the bids at
the subject meeting.
The River Park Square
Project shall include
the construction of a
downtown park with a
Farmers Market, inter-
act i ve f ount ai n,
restroom building, pla-
zas, parking lot, reno-
vation of Water Street,
and additional work as
described in the Plans
and Speci fi cati ons.
The project is located
in the area of Garro,
Water, and LaPorte
Streets in Plymouth,
IN. Hard copy sets of
the Plans and Specifi-
cations may be ob-
tained from The Troyer
Group, 550 Uni on
Street, Mishawaka, IN
46544 beginning Tues-
day March 12 at 8:00
am for a non-refund-
able fee of $75. Plans
and Specifications are
also available free of
charge in digital format
by contacting Michael
Reese at mwr@troyer-
group.com.
A pre-bid meeting will
be held at 10:00 AM
( l ocal t i me) on
Wednesday March 20,
2013 at the Council
Chambers of the City
Building, 124 N. Michi-
gan St. (Garro Street
entrance). All prospec-
tive bidders are en-
couraged to attend.
Bids are to be submit-
ted on the bid form and
on Indiana Form No.
96 and shall be accom-
panied by the required
non-collusion affidavit
financial statement.
Each bid shall be ac-
companied by an ac-
ceptable bid bond, in a
sum of not less than
five (5%) of the total
bid amount. All bids
must be accompanied
by the following city
forms: Affidavit of
E-Verify Compliance,
Verification of Contrac-
tor/Bidder/Quoter of
Compliance with Re-
quirements for Con-
tracting with the City of
Plymouth, Pursuant to
IC 36-1-21-5 and Ordi-
nance No. 2012-2042,
and Certification of
Contractor/Bidder/Quot
er of No Investment
Activities in Iran, Pur-
s u a n t t o I C
5-22-16.5-13.
Bids shall be in sealed
envel opes, marked
with the name and
place of business of
the bidder. All bids
shall be clearly marked
“Sealed Bids – River
Park Square, DO NOT
OPEN”.
No bid shall be with-
drawn after scheduled
closing time for receipt
of bids for at least sixty
(60) days. The owner
reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids, ac-
cept all or any part of
any bid received, and
to waive any and all in-
formalities in bidding,
and to accept the low-
est and/or best bid.
Dated this 7th day of
March, 2013
Plymouth Redevelop-
ment Commission
Toni L. Hutchings,
Clerk-Treasurer
March 12, 19, 2013 PN9690
116
Legals
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
City of Plymouth,
Indiana
River Park Square
Notice is hereby given
that the City of Ply-
mouth, Indiana, by and
through its Redevelop-
ment Commi ssi on,
hereinafter referred to
as the Owner, will re-
ceive sealed bids for
the City of Plymouth
River Park Square Pro-
ject at the Office of the
Clerk-Treasurer of the
City of Plymouth, City
Hall, 124 North Michi-
gan Street, Plymouth,
Indiana 46563.
Sealed bids are invited
and may be forwarded
by registered mail or
delivered in person,
addressed to the City
of Plymouth, in care of
the Clerk-Treasurer by
no later than 4:30 pm
(local time) and will be
considered by the Re-
development Commis-
sion at a public meet-
ing called to open such
bids at 5:30 pm (local
time) on Tuesday, April
2, 2013 at the Council
Chambers of the City
Building, 124 N. Michi-
gan St. (Garro Street
entrance), Plymouth,
Indiana, 46563. Pro-
posals received by the
Clerk-Treasurer after
4:30 pm (local time)
shall be returned un-
opened. The bidder
shall be responsible to
make sure that the
bids are mailed or oth-
erwise delivered to the
Clerk-Treasurer before
said time. One final
call for bids shall be
made prior to the
opening of the bids at
the subject meeting.
The River Park Square
Project shall include
the construction of a
downtown park with a
Farmers Market, inter-
act i ve f ount ai n,
restroom building, pla-
zas, parking lot, reno-
vation of Water Street,
and additional work as
described in the Plans
and Speci fi cati ons.
The project is located
in the area of Garro,
Water, and LaPorte
Streets in Plymouth,
IN. Hard copy sets of
the Plans and Specifi-
cations may be ob-
tained from The Troyer
Group, 550 Uni on
Street, Mishawaka, IN
46544 beginning Tues-
day March 12 at 8:00
am for a non-refund-
able fee of $75. Plans
and Specifications are
also available free of
charge in digital format
by contacting Michael
Reese at mwr@troyer-
group.com.
A pre-bid meeting will
be held at 10:00 AM
( l ocal t i me) on
Wednesday March 20,
2013 at the Council
Chambers of the City
Building, 124 N. Michi-
gan St. (Garro Street
entrance). All prospec-
tive bidders are en-
couraged to attend.
Bids are to be submit-
ted on the bid form and
on Indiana Form No.
96 and shall be accom-
panied by the required
non-collusion affidavit
financial statement.
Each bid shall be ac-
companied by an ac-
ceptable bid bond, in a
sum of not less than
five (5%) of the total
bid amount. All bids
must be accompanied
by the following city
forms: Affidavit of
E-Verify Compliance,
Verification of Contrac-
tor/Bidder/Quoter of
Compliance with Re-
quirements for Con-
tracting with the City of
Plymouth, Pursuant to
IC 36-1-21-5 and Ordi-
nance No. 2012-2042,
and Certification of
Contractor/Bidder/Quot
er of No Investment
Activities in Iran, Pur-
s u a n t t o I C
5-22-16.5-13.
Bids shall be in sealed
envel opes, marked
with the name and
place of business of
the bidder. All bids
shall be clearly marked
“Sealed Bids – River
Park Square, DO NOT
OPEN”.
No bid shall be with-
drawn after scheduled
closing time for receipt
of bids for at least sixty
(60) days. The owner
reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids, ac-
cept all or any part of
any bid received, and
to waive any and all in-
formalities in bidding,
and to accept the low-
est and/or best bid.
Dated this 7th day of
March, 2013
Plymouth Redevelop-
ment Commission
Toni L. Hutchings,
Clerk-Treasurer
March 12, 19, 2013 PN9690
145
Lost & Found
FOUND: MALE, 6
Month old, Chihuahua
mix, blonde/white short
fur, found in Pretty
Lake area, has been
taken to the M.C. Hu-
mane Society.
FOUND: SMALL male
brown and black Ter-
rier Mix w/o a collar
found on 3/8 in the
area of E. Marshall
St reet i n Argos.
(574)892-5829
LOST: BLACK and
White Shih Tzu (might
have on a black collar)
& Brown and white
Shih Tzu named Burt
and Ernie, both males.
Will be traveling to-
gether. Last seen at
the corner of Michigan
and Madison in the
mo r n i n g 3 / 1 1 .
( 574) 936- 9360 or
(574)229-2669 Re-
ward!
168
Childcare
BABY-SITTING:
FULL/PART-TIME,
spring break. Great
rates, your house or
mi ne. Ar gos
(574)281-2731
170
Help Wanted
BE SOMEBODY' S
Hero for Life. Donate
Plasma! You Could
Earn Up To $400 a
Month! -18-64 Years of
Age -Valid Picture ID
-Be in Good Health
-Proof of Social Secu-
rity Number -Proof of
Current Resi dence
Postmarked Wi thi n
Last 30 Days. Octa-
pharma Plasma Inc.
2102 S. Michigan St.
South Bend, IN 46613
574-234-9568 Bring
this ad and receive a
$5 bonus when you
complete your first do-
nation! www.octaphar-
maplasma.com
CLUB
MANAGER/COOK,
Apply in person, Argos
American Legion after
4p, Call 892-6509.
ROCK ST ARS
wanted! Jimmy John’s
in Plymouth, IN is now
hiring Sandwich Mak-
ers! Must have a killer
work ethic, rock star
personality and be
ready to l earn! If
you’ve got what it
takes to work for the
hottest and fastest
growing restaurant in
the US of A, stop by
and apply at 2129 N.
Oak Dr. Plymouth, IN
SITTER NEEDED in
my home for 3rd shift
Must have references.
(574)292-9741
170
Help Wanted
Managing Editor
The Pilot News Group
has an i mmedi ate
opening for a Manag-
ing Editor for our group
of 8 papers, which in-
cl ude a Monday
through Saturday daily,
5 weekly papers and 2
TMC products. Looking
for an experienced
hands on person to
take the newsroom to
new levels covering lo-
cal news and sports.
Experience with In-
Design helpful but will
train if needed. If inter-
ested please send re-
sume to; C Stockton,
C/O Pilot News, 214
N.Mi chi gan Street,
PLymouth, IN. 46563
o r e m a i l
cstockton@thepilot-
news.com. EOE
SUB-CONTRACTORS
NEEDED in all areas
of residential construc-
tion. Send resume to:
k.const@mediacombb.
net.
175
Drivers Wanted
HIRING CDL drivers:
up to $65,000 per year.
Owner/operators up to
$200,000 per year to
deliver boats, home
w e e k l y , c a l l
574-293-7858.
Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress!
Earn $800+
per week!
No exp. needed!
CDL Trained &
Job-Ready In 15
days! Call
1-800-882-7364
TANKER DRIVERS
wanted, Class-A CDL
w/hazmat endorse-
ment. Must have clean
MVR, 2 years mini-
mum experience, day
& night shifts available.
401k, medical, vision,
dental insurance avail-
able. (317)477-5054
amy@jastrucking.net
200
Apartments for
Rent
2 BR, 1 BR, Studios
FREE RENT Specials!
(574) 936-3496
www.valueproperties.net
CLEAN 1-BEDROOM
Apartment
$110/weekly, $200/de-
posit. No pets. Nap-
panee (574)305-0046
Mallard Lake
Apartments
574-936-0004
Large 2 bedroom
units
Pet friendly
NAPPANEE: 2BR-Du-
plex w/Central Air. Wa-
ter/Sewer and Trash
Included in rent. De-
posi t / $350 t hen
$450/ mo. Cal l :
574-267-3460
PLYMOUTH: 2BR,
1BA, cent ral ai r,
washer/dryer hookup,
stove & refrigerator.
$405/mo+$350 de-
posit. 574-267-3460.
205
Houses for Rent
LAKE HOUSE for rent:
Newl y remodel ed,
large 1BR at Bass
Lake, 4059 S. 625 E,
l ar ge l i vi ng- r oom,
eat-in kitch, you pay
utilities, pier, quiet,
storage. Iyr lease,
$550/month +secutity.
Available 2/15. Call
574-806-1049
LAKE HOUSE: 3
Bdrms (12x10's apprx),
Large LV RM, fire-
place, fenced yard,
storage, quiet area,
5063 Summer-home
Dr., you pay utilities,
$750/ Mont h pl us
$750/ Securi t y. No
p e t s . C a l l
574-806-1049
NICE 3BR/2BA: Easy
access to 31, Roches-
ter Area. $795/month
p l u s d e p o s i t .
(574)292-2496
PLYMOUTH: 2 BED-
ROOM home. No
smoking, service ani-
m a l s o n l y .
(574)936-7806
255
Homes for Sale
DOUBLE-WIDE MO-
BILE home in River
Park, Baker St. Ply-
mouth. 2BA, 26x64,
Great condition. Rea-
sonably priced. Lat-44
Phone:574-936-4005.
300
Pets & Supplies
FREE 3 y/o fat, fluffy
cat wants a quiet home
and a warm lap. Bre-
men. (574)248-1570
FREE 8 month old
male cat. All shots, no
fleas, very playful, well
maintained.
(574)248-1570
330
Articles for Sale
SET OF tools with tool
box and a drill press.
(574)210-4852
390
Wanted to Buy
BUYING COIN
Collections, Silver
& Gold Items
(574)209-1001
400
Automobiles
2006 TOYOTA Avalon
Limited, Loaded, Great
Condition, $14,900.
Call 574-935-5929.
Regional
Advertising
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
Regional
Advertising
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
Regional
Advertising
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
Regional
Advertising
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
Regional
Advertising
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING - Train for hands
on Aviation Career.
FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified. Job Place-
ment assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance.
877-803-8630
SCHOOL/INSTRUC-
TIONS
Medical careers begin
here - Train ONLINE
for Allied Health and
Medical Management.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if
qual i f i ed. SCHEV
Aut hor i zed. Cal l
877-692-9599
www.CenturaOnline.co
m
MISCELLANEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-888-531-6141
To advertise,
please call
936-3101.
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
ADVERTISERS: You
can place a 25-word
classified ad in more
than 140 newspapers
across the state for as
little as $320.00 with
one order and paying
with one check through
ICAN, Indiana Classi-
fied Advertising Net-
work. For Information
contact the classified
department of your lo-
cal newspaper or call
ICAN direct at Hoosier
State Press Associa-
tion, (317) 803-4772.
ADOPTION
Adoption - Working
Dad (future stay at
home) mom wishes to
adopt a Precious new-
born. Promises to pro-
vi de uncondi t i onal
love. Expenses paid.
Call Eileen & Andy
1-800-941-3158.
ADOPT: Hopeful 1st
time mom & dad prom-
ise your baby a lifetime
of love. Expenses pd.
Paul a & Er i k,
1-866-664-1213.
ADOPT: We will pro-
vide a happy, loving
home, beautiful life for
your precious newborn
baby. Expenses paid.
Devoted married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina. Call for
info: 1-800-315-6957
AUTOS/TOWING
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS
SWAP MEET & CAR
SALE All Make &
Model - All Indoor -
700 Spaces, March
24th, 2013 Indiana
State Fairgrounds, In-
d i a n a p o l i s , I N
8 a m- 3 p m I n f o .
708-563-4300
www.SuperSunday-
Indy.com
CAREER TRAINING
AIRLINE CAREERS -
Become an Aviation
Mai ntenance Tech.
FAA approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied. Housing available.
Job placement assis-
tance. AC0901 CALL
Aviation Institute of
Mai ntenance (888)
242-3197
FISHING & HUNTING
VACATION CABINS
FOR RENT IN CAN-
ADA. Fish for walleyes,
per ch, nor t her ns.
Boats, motors, gaso-
l i ne i ncl uded. Cal l
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site
www.bestfishing.com
FOR SALE - MER-
CHANDISE, SERV-
ICES & MISCELLA-
NEOUS
DISH Network. Starting
at $19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-877-825-9465
Hi ghspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster
than dial-up.) Starting
at $49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
HEALTH
IF YOU USED THE
MIRENA IUD between
2001-present and suf-
fered perforation or
embedment i n the
uterus requiring surgi-
cal removal, or had a
child born with birth de-
fects you may be enti-
tled to compensation.
Call Johnson Law and
speak with female staff
members
1-800-535-5727
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3 Week
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excavators.
National Certifications.
Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benef i t s El i gi bl e.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
EARN $500 A DAY: In-
sur ance Agent s
Needed: Leads, No
Cold Calls; Commis-
sions Paid Daily; Com-
plete Training; Health
& Dental Insurance:
Life License Required.
Call 1-888-713-6020.
HELP WANTED -
DRIVERS
Flatbed Drivers New
Pay Scale - Start @
.37cpm. Up to .04cpm
Mileage Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insurance
and 401K. Apply @
Boydandsons.com
800-648-9915
DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK!
MAVERICK IS NOW
HIRING IN YOUR
AREA!! OTR & re-
gi onal runs, some
dedicated available.
Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for
training. Great pay &
home time in several
divisions including flat-
bed, glass and reefer.
Must be 21yrs old &
hold Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100.
www.drivemaverick.co
m
Dri vers - CDL-A
$5,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS For exp'd solo
OTR drivers & O/O's.
Tuition reimbursement
also available! New
Student Pay & Lease
Program USA TRUCK
877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.co
m
Dri vers: I nexperi -
enced? Get on the
Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Train-
ing. Regional Training
Locations. Train and
WORK for Central Re-
f r i ger at ed ( 877)
369-7203 www.central-
truckdrivingjobs.com
Driver - Qualify foR
any por t i on of
$.03/mile quarterly bo-
nus: $.01 Safety, $.01
Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
AVERITT OFFERS
CDL-A DRIVERS a
Strong, Stable, Profit-
able Career. Experi-
enced Drivers and Re-
cent Grads - Excellent
Benef i t s, Weekl y
Hometime. Paid train-
ing. 888-362-8608 Av-
erittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer
"You got the drive, We
have the Direction"
OTR Drivers - APU
Equi pped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger
policy. Newer equip-
ment . 100% NO
Touch.
1-800-528-7825
Owner Operat ors:
$5,000 Sign-On Bo-
nus. Excellent Rates &
Paid FSC. Hometime
throughout the week.
Great Fuel & Tire Dis-
counts. Third Party
Lease Purchase avail-
able. CDL-A with 1
year expereince re-
q u i r e d . C a l l
888-703-3889 or apply
o n l i n e a t
www.comtrak.com
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
No experience neces-
sary. Learn to drive for
TMC TRANSPORTA-
TION Earn $800 per
week. Local 15-day
CDL t r a i n i n g .
1-800-882-7364.
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for TMC
Transportation. Earn
$800 per week! Local
15 day CDL training.
TMC can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156.
RECENTLY LAI D
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to be
a professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS! The avg. truck
d r i v e r e a r n s
$700+/wk*! Get CDL
Training w/Roadmas-
ter! Approved for Vet-
erans Training. Don't
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
* DOL/ BLS 2012
AC-0205
Dedi cat ed Dri vers
Needed! Exceptional
Pay ($60-$70K annu-
ally) and Benefit pack-
age. Run regionally, be
home weekly! New
Trucks! Call TODAY
888-409-6033 Or visit
online
www.DRIVEJTC.com
MEDICAL
ATTENTION SLEEP
APNEA SUFFERERS
with Medicare. Get
CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO
COST, plus FREE
home delivery! Best of
all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial in-
f e c t i o n ! C a l l
1-888-696-5125
SPORTING GOODS /
GUNS & HUNTING /
MISCELLANEOUS
GUN SHOW!! Bedford,
IN - March 16th & 17th,
Lawrence County Fair-
grounds, 11261 US
Hwy 50 W., Sat. 9-5,
Sun. 9-3 For informa-
tion call 765-993-8942
Buy! Sell! Trade!
INDY 1500 GUN &
KNIFE SHOW - Indi-
ana's Largest! State
Fai rgrounds. South
Pavillion. Fri., March
15, 2-8. Sat., March
16, 8-6. Sun., March
17, 9-4. Bring this ad
for $1 off 1 admission.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS
Year End Blow-Out.
MAKE OFFER and
Low Monthly Payments
on 4 Remai ni ng.
20x20, 25x28, 30x40,
40x56 SAVE Thou-
sands Cal l Now!
800-991-9251
Reading the newspaper
is a great way for stu-
dents to improve their
reading skills as well as
their knowledge of cur-
rent events!
To subscribe, please call
936-3101
BY HELOISE
Personal Info
Takes a TrIP
Dear Heloise: My friends
took a trip to South Amer-
ica. They stayed at several
different resorts and visited
many parks and other inter-
esting places.
Once they returned back
home, they found that
their PHONES had been “stolen.” Not the actual
phones, but their account!
Someone was able to make changes to the
account, adding international features that added
large charges onto their bill.
They had to call their cellphone provider and
speak to the fraud department to fnally get their
account back to where it should be. They were
able to keep the same cellphone number, but it
was quite time-consuming to straighten out the ac-
count.
They also found that their credit-card number
had been stolen and used to make large purchases.
Since they had stayed at several different resorts, it
was impossible to determine where or when their
information was stolen.
So, I would caution any travelers to be careful
when traveling, because there are thieves out there
just waiting to steal your information or identity.
-- Ruth in Texas
Yikes! It makes one never want to leave home!
It’s important to let your cellphone and credit-card
companies know that you will be traveling, espe-
cially if you’re going out of the country. They can
put an alert on your account for unusual activity.
-- Heloise
GerM-free GYM BaG
Dear Heloise: I try to go to the gym after work,
and I use the lockers for my gym bag. With the fu
and other sicknesses about, when I bring my gym
bag home, I spray it inside and out with a germ-
killing spray, especially the bottom, where it sat
in the locker. So far, I have been able to avoid get-
ting sick, and that is a good thing! -- M.C. in New
York
CarT CoUrTesY
Dear Heloise: This is in response to the person
who wanted everyone to take a stray shopping cart
into the store to clear the parking lot. I am amazed
at the number of people who are too lazy to take
their shopping carts to the corral. They will make
a huge effort to anchor it up on a curb, or simply
leave it by where their car was.
If you are disabled and can’t return the cart,
ask someone to help you take out your groceries.
If I see someone who is fnishing loading the car
as I walk by, I offer to take the cart. -- Karen, via
email
lUnCH noTes
Dear Heloise: Your column (Heloise here:
about love notes) in our paper brought back good
memories. When my brother was in school, my
mother always put a note in his lunch bag, usually
with just a line saying, “Remember your jacket,”
“Finish your corn,” a good day.” My brother loved
these notes. One day she put a note in his lunch bag
that read “No note today.” -- Bonnie, via email
Send a money-saving or timesaving hint to He-
loise, P.O. Box 795000, San Antonio, TX 78279-
5000, or you can fax it to 1-210-HELOISE or
email it to Heloise(at)Heloise.com. I can’t answer
your letter personally but will use the best hints
received in my column. (c)2013 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
HInTs froM HeloIse
Classifieds
Page A11 Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Word your 1 item (no multiple items or litters of pets, etc.) Ad in the boxes below using 1 letter for each space. Price must appear in
the ad. Classified Bargain Finder is open to Private Party customers ONLY - No commercial customers, please. 3 lines only. Ads will
be put in the paper as time permits. Limited to 5 entries per household per month, please. NO PHONE ORDERS.
Please Print Clearly.
Phone:
Name: ______________________________________________ Phone: ________________________
Address: __________________________________________ City: ___________________________
State/Zip: _________________ Daytime Phone: __________________________________________
Classified Bargain Finder ads will be place in the paper as soon as possible after the ad is received and run consecutively 3 days in
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Place your ad in the Pilot News'
Classified Bargain Finder
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Fill out the coupon below with your $50 or less item and send to:
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Reach over 98,000 potential customers every week in the Community Classifed Business & Service
Directory for as little as $115.00 a month. Call 574-936-3101 or 800-933-0356 to place your ad today!
BUsIness & servICe
DIreCTorY
498
Audio/Video
TV ANTENNAS INSTALLED
TROUBLE SHOOTING
TV TOWERS PAINTED
TV TOWERS REMOVED
574-216-8079
574-721-9794
505
Carpets/Rugs
Benefiel’s
Carpet Cleaning Services
Residential & Commercial
Carpet & Upholstery Professional Cleaning
David Benefiel
Owner - Operator
574-780-2723
Plymouth
510
Cleaning Services
CleanRite Cleaning Service
Est. 2000 • BBB • Chamber Member
Homes, Businesses,
Apts & Windows
Insured • Bonded
574-586-9614
574-274-2424
Dawn Gorby-Verhaeghe - Owner
www.cleanritecleaning.com
BEST OF
Marshall
County
2012
1ST Place
A Helping Hand
Cleaning Service
17 years experience
Marshall County
Homes & Offices
574-767-1480
520 Concrete
/ Cement / Blacktop
TLC Construction
General Contractor
For All Your Remolding and
New Construction needs.
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL
Roofing, Siding, Decks, Replacement
Windows, Etc., Barn Repairs
Metal Roofs and Siding.
Seamless Gutters over 30+ colors - repair
and cleaning available.
License, bonded, insured.
Over 20 years experience.
Lee Fritz-Owner
Cell 574-298-3831
Plymouth, IN 46563
520 Concrete
/ Cement / Blacktop
Call
The Concrete Guy
For All Your Concrete Needs!
574-248-5394
Midwest Concrete
& Construction
SPRING SPECIALS
Residential • Commercial • AG
Grain Bins, Foundation, Flatwork
Tear out & Replace
All Work Guaranteed!!!
574-316-2387
525
Contractors
Post & Steel Frame Building
Barn Restoration • Concrete Work
Free Quotes • 20 yrs. Exp.
Reasonable Rates
Quality Workmanship
1-800-747-6516
“Trustworthy People & Buildings”
www.steelridge.biz
Build Now
With...
M
C
B
Mike Czajowski
Builders
Established in 1976
Basement Egress
Windows
Complete in ONE DAY!
574-546-4617
574-930-4522
mikecbuilders.com
DON’T MOVE, IMPROVE!
New construction, additions,
remodels & more!
(574) 300-9903
www.homeforceinc.com
525
Contractors
L-NOLT & Sons
New Construction & Remodeling
Pole Barns
Shingles
Metal Roofing
Insured & Free Estimates
Leroy Nolt (574)538-9225
530
Decks
Four Seasons Custom
Decks and Fences
Don & Janice Stanley, Owners
Call 574-936-1385 or 574-936-1968
(Bonded • Insured • Free Estimates)
www.decksbyfourseasons.com
545
Excavating
Jay Stone
14501 Lincoln Hwy.
Plymouth, IN 46563
(574) 935-5456 www.stoneexcavating.com
EXCAVATING
SEPTIC PUMPING
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
• Sewer &
Drain Cleaning
• Portable Restroom Service
550
Fencing
Mullet’s Fencing LLC
Fencing Supplies
Residential - Commercial
Agricultural - Industrial
Dave Gill • Ivan Kramer
574-354-0803 • 1-888-211-9368
Established in 1986
553
Financial Services
BANKRUPTCY:
FREE CONSULTATION
$25.00 to Start. Payment Plans
Available. Ch. 13 No Money Down.
Filing fee not included. Call Collect
574-269-3634, Warsaw, IN. Sat. &
Even. Appt. Available. Debt Relief
Agency under Bankruptcy Code.
555
Flooring
RICHARD’S
FLOORING
Tile ~ Hardwood ~ Laminate
Vinyl ~ Carpet ~ Subfloor
3 Generations of experience,
lots of references.
Call us today to have your new
floor installed before spring.
(574)542-2530 or
(574)806-7425
565
Home Improvement/
Remodel
JL Home
Improvements
This & That, Remodel & Build,
Decks & Fences, Power Washing &
Hauling. “Why pay more?”
(574)936-4818 or
(574)304-4743 *Insured*
580
Lawn/Garden
Eckert Lawn Service
**Serving the area since 1989**
Mowing • Stump Grinding
Property & Storm Clean-up
Merle Eckert - owner
574-936-2088 or 298-8850
Voted “Best of Marshall Co.”
583
Miscellaneous Services
BUYING
Estate, Collections,
Hunting, Military,
Electronics, Mens Items
Cash
Keith 574-936-6035
Find Your New Tenant Fast!
Find Your New Rental Home
***Over 1600 Local
Registered Users! ***
Visit Us or Call Today!
www.mytenantnow.com
(574)892 -5227
595
Plumbing
PLUMBING
&
HEATING, INC.
574-784-2005
“QUALITY SERVICE AT A REASONABLE RATE”
• RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • FREE ESTIMATES
SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION
PLUMBING • HEATING • REFRIGERATION
LICENSE # - CP 1930006
Rhodes Repair (Jim’s)
Formerly Jolly &Sons
Sewer & Drain Cleaning
Mobile Homes, Heating & Air
Plumbing & Electrical
574-936-5520/574-952-2713
574-935-5362
605
Roof/Siding/Gutter
Johnny’s Roofing
“Serving Marshall County since 1972!”
Shingle & Flat Roofs
Roof Repairs
Spend a little now, save a lot later.
574-892-5007
Metal Re-Roofing
Residential
Commercial
Agricultural
Barn Restoration
Free Quotes - 20 yrs. exp.
1-800-747-6516
629
Small Appliance Repair
Markley
Appliance
Repair
Servicing most
brands
574-546-4583
Certified Technician
650
Tree Services
Hooters
Tree Service
Tree trimming, topping, stump removal, fire wood,
top soil, demolition, excavating/trucking.
Fully Insured.
574-936-5818
650
Tree Services
S & S Tree Service
Tree & Stump Removal
Tree Trimming
25 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Fully Insured -
FREE ESTIMATES
767-1331
or
930-0576
Accepting all major credit cards
Firewood for Sale
Now offering full
Lawn Maintenance
& Landscaping
Pro Tree Service
1550 Wentzel St., Rochester, IN
• Tree Transplanting • Portable Sawmill Service
• Full time climbing crew
• Stump Grinding & Removal
• Bucket Truck Crews Available
• $2 Million Liability Insurance
Free Estimates 574-223-9971
“Just Look For Our Purple Trucks”
651
Towing
DOUG BUYS
JUNK CARS
574-310-DOUG
We've always counted on the
Business & Service Directory
when needing help.
If you have a job you need done
correctly contact one of
the professionals listed here.
Word your 1 item (no multiple items or litters of pets, etc.) Ad in the boxes below using 1 letter for each space. Price must appear in
the ad. Classified Bargain Finder is open to Private Party customers ONLY - No commercial customers, please. 3 lines only. Ads will
be put in the paper as time permits. Limited to 5 entries per household per month, please. NO PHONE ORDERS.
Please Print Clearly.
Phone:
Name: ______________________________________________ Phone: ________________________
Address: __________________________________________ City: ___________________________
State/Zip: _________________ Daytime Phone: __________________________________________
Classified Bargain Finder ads will be place in the paper as soon as possible after the ad is received and run consecutively 3 days in
the Pilot News and once in each weekly paper: The Review, The Shopper, The Leader, Culver Citizen, Bourbon News-Mirror,
Bremen Enquirer and the Advance News - all for FREE
Place your ad in the Pilot News'
Classified Bargain Finder
Where ads for any item $50 and under are
Free! Free! Free!
Fill out the coupon below with your $50 or less item and send to:
Pilot News Classified
214 N. Michigan St., Plymouth, IN 46563
No phone orders, please!
$
50
or less
Where
every item,
every day is
Bargain Finders
AB COASTER, $50.
(574)952-0406
AB ROCKET twister,
$50. (574)952-0406
CHARCOAL GRILL
w/ c o v e r . $ 3 5 .
(574)936-7094
PAK N Play & High
chair, great shape.
$40/both.
(574)936-6994
Local
Pilot News • Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Page A12
Ag day
PHOTOS PROVIDED
Wednesday, Feb. 20, as part of
National FFA week, the Triton FFA
group put on the annual Ag Day.
Elementary students were invited
to come over to Triton High School
and learn about eight different parts
of agriculture. This year Ag Day fea-
tured sheep, horses, ducks, pigs,
dairy cows, goats, farm safety, and
rabbits. The FFA students gave a
short 2-3 minute presentation to
each group of elementary students
to share the importance of each.
Overall the Ag Day was a huge
success while both the elementary
and high school students were able
to learn something while having
fun. Thursday and Friday, Feb. 21
and 22, the Triton FFA wrapped up
FFA week with plaid day and drive
your truck to school day Thursday
and camouflage day Friday. Also,
Friday the FFA had its annual ag
appreciation lunch. For any other
information or any questions about
the Triton FFA program, please
contact April Leeper, Triton FFA
advisor.
ABOVE: At the horse station, FFA
member Allie Kann teaches ele-
mentary students about what hors-
es can do.
LEFT: Nathan Long, left, and
Landon Kaufman, right, teach
a group of elementary students
about sheep.
KOKOMO — Argos Jr.-Sr. High School vocal students took
22 events to ISSMA vocal contest Feb. 2 at Northwestern High
School and received 14 Gold ratings and eight Silver ratings.
Soloists who received Gold ratings in Division I and
advanced to state are Emma Nellans, Henry Harrell, Libby
Moyer, and Sabrina Bradley. Other soloists who received
Gold ratings were: Dalton Hartle, Aaron Spicer, Daniel
Johnson, Noah Spicer, and Harlie Reed. Soloists who
received Silver ratings were: Sabrina Bradley, Bruce Fosler,
Samantha Flower, Justin Carr, and Derek Smith.
The high school girls ensemble sang “Bless the Broken
Road” and received a Gold rating. Members of that ensem-
ble were: Athena Blevins, McKayla Casu, Taylor Norman,
Symphony Bixel, Katie Williams, Shacoda Leed, Kayla
Hendricks, RaeLynn LaFrance, Courtney DeMont, Valerie
Rospopo, Libby Moyer, Sabrina Bradley, Madi Williams,
Kirsten Ringer, Kelsey Kring, Lacee Tuttle, Shelby Sanders,
Kaitlin Howard, and Kennedy Yakas.
The high school boys ensemble sang “Hey, Ho Nobody’s
Home” and received a Gold rating. Members were: Derek
Smith, Matt Milliser, Ryan Calhoun, Daniel Johnson, Bruce
Fosler, Noah Spicer, Duncan Sheehan, Brian Boberg, Henry
Harrell, Brian Snyder, Kyle Kline, Justin Carr, and Ben Carter.
One high school mixed ensemble sang “Didn’t My Lord
Deliver Daniel” and received a Gold rating. Members of that
ensemble were: Emma Nellans, RaeLynn LaFrance, Shacoda
Leed, Katie Williams, Symphony Bixel, Courtney DeMont,
Sabrina Bradley, Madi Williams, Kaitlin Howard, Kennedy
Yakas, Lacee Tuttle, Kelsey Kring, Daniel Johnson, Derek
Smith, Matthew Milliser, Brian Snyder, Henry Harrell, Noah
Spicer, Brandon Thomas, and Duncan Sheehan.
A second high school ensemble sang “The Shepherd’s
Chorus” and received a Silver rating. Members included:
Kayla Hendricks, Emma Nellans, Samantha Flower, Taylor
Norman, McKayla Casu, Athena Blevins, Sammie Hopkins,
Madi Williams, Shelby Sanders, Kirsten Ringer, Sabrina
Brown, Libby Moyer, Daniel Johnson, Ryan Calhoun, Derek
Smith, Brian Snyder, Henry Harrell, Noah Spicer, Ben Carter,
and Bruce Fosler.
The girls barbershop quartet sang “Aba Daba Honeymoon”
and received a silver rating. Members included Emma
Nellans, Sabrina Brown, Madi Williams, and Libby Moyer.
The boys barbershop quartet sang “Coney Island Baby” and
received a silver rating. Members included Noah Spicer,
Henry Harrell, Daniel Johnson, and Derek Smith.
Argos band students took nine events to band contest Jan.
26 and received six Gold ratings and three Silver ratings.
Amanda Middleton received a Gold rating in Division 1 and
moved on to state competition. Other soloists who received
gold ratings were Abby Manikowski, Jared Thieling, Aaron
Spicer, and Chris Stark. Soloists who received Silver ratings
were Jessica Bradley, Katie Dean, and Jenni Fishburn. The
sax trio of Aaron Spicer, Evan Johnson, and Aaron Dowdle
also received a Gold rating.
Vocal Solos: Dalton Hartle “This Land is Your Land, This
Land is My Land” gold; Harlie Reed “Castle on a Cloud”
gold; Aaron Spicer “Angels Through the Night” Gold; Vocal
Ensemble: “Single Voice, Solitary Flame” Gold; Kennedy
Binkley, Alexis Bixel, Gabby Cataldo, Ashley Dean, Katie
Dean, Kirsten Ganshorn, Diana Gomez, Dalton Hartle, Evan
Johnson, Wryanne Leed, Lizzie Pask, Harlie Reed, Makayla
Reynolds, Aaron Spicer, McKenzie Stepp, Zach Trump,
Lexie VanDerWeele; “Climbin’ Up the Mountain” Gold —
Kennedy Binkley, Gabby Cataldo, Ashley Dean, Kirsten
Ganshorn, Diana Gomez, Evan Johnson, Wryanne Leed,
Ike Nellans, Tori Obrochta, Harlie Reed, Sharon Rodriquez,
Aaron Spicer, Blake Thomas, Brooklyn Thomas, Zach Trump,
Lexie VanDerWeele, Shania Walters
Argos Jr.-Sr. High competes
at ISSMA vocal contest
Community12
A new report
says sky-high levels of
a nasty blood fat called
Lp(a) -- short for lipo-
protein (a) -- double your
risk for severe heart-valve
damage, boosting odds that you'll need a replacement valve
sometime between ages 60 and 90. Lp(a) stiffens and clogs the
walls of valves and arteries, and the threat (and consequent
need for surgery to repair it or install a new valve) is not rare.
Baby boomers and their older friends and relatives are
dealing with the problem. (A quarter of adults 70-plus al-
ready have signs of heart-valve thickening; more than half
of the more than 5,000 open-heart procedures at Cleveland
Clinic now involve valve repair or replacement.) Fortunately,
there's plenty you can do NOW to safeguard your valves.
Valve 101: The four valves in your heart control the flow
of blood to your lungs and to arteries that feed every cell in
your body. A stenotic valve (it doesn't open wide enough or
close properly) reduces blood flow, causing fatigue, shortness
of breath and even heart failure. It also boosts your risk for
clots that cause heart attacks and strokes.
Risk factors include some things you can't do much about:
age, genetics (that's the cause for 10 percent of folks with the
condition) and having had rheumatic fever (a common com-
plication of strep throat before
antibiotics became the go-to
treatment in the 1950s). But
there are other triggers -- such
as high blood pressure, high
LDL cholesterol, diabetes,
smoking and a double-wide
waistline -- that you can do
something about.
Valve protection: Cleve-
land Clinic, where Dr. Mike
works, routinely measures
Lp(a) levels, and recommends
statins when those levels are
high. In one study at the hos-
pital's Preventive Cardiology
Clinic, people with high Lp(a)
levels who took statins erased
excess risk for heart-related
deaths.
Now we think statins can
help slash risk for valve prob-
lems. Studies have shown that
in people with early signs of
valve thickening, statins can
cut the risk for serious valve
harm by 36 percent. The trick? Start early, before your valves
suffer damage.
One way to discover if you're beginning to get valve dam-
age is to get an echocardiogram. But even if your valves seem
OK, if your Lp(a) levels are high, ask your doctor about tak-
ing a statin. A bonus: They'll provide protection against other
heart-health risks and may cut your risk for Alzheimer's dis-
ease.
Here are other ways you can protect your heart and heart
valves from damage:
Keep a lid on your blood pressure. High blood pressure
heats up your risk for damaged valves by as much as 74
percent. Eat less sodium (less processed and fast food), and
get your fill of more blood-pressure-calming calcium, potas-
sium and magnesium, found in low-fat or fat-free dairy, fruit,
vegetables, beans and 100 percent whole grains. Watch your
weight, and fit in a half-hour walk every day; your cholesterol
levels will benefit, too.
Kick that habit. Smoking more than doubles your risk for
severe valve damage. Make a quit plan (check out our proven
strategies at RealAge.com); talk with your doc about crave-
controlling medications and counseling support. Then make
it happen.
Cool off inflammation. Inflammatory compounds in your
bloodstream have been linked to greater risk for stiff, calcium-
speckled valves. So whittle your waistline, exercise regularly
and decorate your plate with healthy foods such as fresh and
frozen fruit and vegetables, beans, and 100 percent whole
grains. And do not forget the added benefit of the odd ome-
gas: DHA omega-3 (900 mg a day from fish or supplements);
ALA omega-3 (from walnuts, flax, chia or avocados); and pu-
rified omega-7.
Already have stiff or damaged valves? Follow your doc-
tor's advice for avoiding infections, which pose an extra threat
now. Get your vaccinations, and you may need antibiotics be-
fore dental work or before some invasive medical tests. And
ask your doc about adding a low-dose statin medication to
any current regimen, even if your cholesterol levels are nor-
mal. Stay smart for your heart.
Protecting your precious heart valves
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This document is © 2013 by greghilde - all rights reserved.
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